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CYF Praise For ‘Killing Tomorrow’

Media Release 28/11/2001

Child, Youth and Family is praising Screentime-Communicado, TV3 and other partners for the way they have worked together to develop tonight’s Killing Tomorrow programme on child abuse and the panel discussion afterwards.

“Killing Tomorrow and the panel discussion are going to be a very powerful way of educating people about the issues and what we can do to protect children,” says Child, Youth and Family’s chief executive Jackie Brown. “TV3, Screentime-Communicado and others involved in the programme are to be commended for the effort they’ve all put in to get the message across clearly and effectively and to manage the impact of the show.”

Ms Brown says the department has worked closely with Screentime-Communicado and others involved in putting the programme together for several months now.

“We’ve worked hard with the working party whose members are all deeply committed to making sure the programme is realistic and that the discussion is constructive. We want to help create an environment where child abuse is less able to exist and we’re very pleased Screentime-Communicado has decided to help raise these serious issues.”

Ms Brown says Killing Tomorrow depicts situations where children are very seriously abused.

“However, abuse also occurs in situations that are less serious than those depicted and Child, Youth and Family and a range of community organisations are available to help in these cases as well. We’re keen to help stop abuse escalating.

“New Zealanders are no longer prepared to tolerate child abuse. Ultimately stopping abuse and neglect is about changing adult behaviour. We must all watch out for our children. People can do something and make a difference.

“The public has a clear role. All New Zealanders have a part to play in preventing abuse and caring for children. We need government agencies, community organisations, iwi, hapu, families and whanau to work together to promote child well-being.

“Using good parenting skills, for example, is one very important way of ensuring child well-being and helping avoid abuse and neglect.

“Our Everyday Families booklet that we’re making available after the programme contains many useful tips for parents in areas such as dealing with children’s difficult behaviour and avoiding family conflicts.

“Child, Youth and Family has highly committed staff who care passionately about the children they work with. But without our community partners and members of the public, our job would be impossible.

“Our focus is on long-term well-being for children as well as immediate safety. That ‘s something that must involve the whole community.“

Ends

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