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NZMJ To Go Electronic

The New Zealand Medical Association, as the owners of the New Zealand Medical Journal, today announce a major change for the Journal.

From the middle of next year, the NZMJ will become an entirely electronic web-based Journal and will cease paper publication.

NZMA Chairman Dr John Adams said the NZMA Board made the decision this week to ensure the future viability and relevance of the Journal.

For some years now the NZMJ has operated with a substantial six figure deficit, mainly due to decreasing advertising (particularly from pharmaceutical companies), while editorial and production costs have increased steadily. This year the NZMA has had to spend nearly $300,000 of members' money to support the Journal.

This week's decision followed an extended review of the NZMJ and careful examination of a number of other publishing options - none of which offered the NZMA the opportunity to substantially reduce the Journal's deficit. The web-based publishing option is the only one identified which will make a significant difference.

"This gives us a cost effective option for the future, ensuring that the medical profession in New Zealand continues to have the opportunity to publish its research in a peer reviewed New Zealand-based journal," Dr Adams said.

"As well, the electronic NZMJ will be archived and fully searchable, making it extremely useful to the research community."

The NZMJ is one of New Zealand's oldest publications. It is New Zealand's leading medical research publication and is held in high regard by the profession. It was first published in 1887.

"We are pleased that it is going to continue in a form which should ensure its viability for the future," Dr Adams said.

The transition to the electronic NZMJ will take place over the next seven months.

ENDS


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