News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

He Tatauranga Takitaro no te Rangahau

He Tatauranga Takitaro no te Rangahau i te Ora o te Reo Maori: 2001

He Tatauranga Takitaro nö te Rangahau i te Ora o te Reo Mäori Kitea ana i ngä tatauranga takitaro i whakaputahia i te rä nei nö te Rangahau i te Ora o te Reo Mäori, e 42 örau ngä Mäori e pakeke ake ana i te 15 tau (136,600 tängata) he pükenga reo Mäori ö rätau. He mea tono a Te Tari Tatau e Te Puni Kökiri mäna e whakahaere te rangahau nei, ä, mahia ana te mahi nei i te Haratua me te Pipiri o te tau 2001.

E iwa örau ngä pakeke Mäori e 'pai' ana, e 'pai rawa atu' ana ränei tö rätau möhio ki te körero Mäori. I tua atu i a rätau, tërä anö te 33 örau e 'ähua pai' ana, 'ehara ränei i te tino pai' tö rätau möhio ki te körero Mäori. Katoa ëtahi atu pakeke Mäori, e 58 örau nei, kähore i te möhio ki te körero Mäori 'i tua atu i ëtahi kupu noa iho, i ëtahi kïanga ränei'. Inä tätarihia ana ngä tatauranga nei i runga i te pakeke o te tangata, ka kitea kei te rëanga kaumätua te nui o ngä pükenga körero e takoto ana. I kï te 30 örau o ngä kaumätua e pakeke ake ana i te 55 tau, e 'pai' ana, e 'pai rawa atu' ana ränei tö rätou möhio ki te körero Mäori.

Heoi anö, kei te kitea atu e tipu ake ana te nui o ngä taiohi e tino matatau ana ki te körero Mäori. I kï töna 6 örau o ngä taiohi e 15-24 tau te pakeke 'he pai', 'he pai rawa atu' rätau ki te körero Mäori, ä, he nui ake tënei i te 4 örau o te hunga e 25-34 tau te pakeke i pënei tä rätau kï. He nui ake ngä taiohi wähine e eke ana ki ngä taumata o te matatau, tënä i ngä tamatäne. E 9 örau ngä wähine e 15-24 tau te pakeke i kï, 'he pai', 'he pai rawa atu' ränei rätau ki te körero Mäori, engari e 3 örau kë te nui o ngä tamatäne i pënei te kï. Koianei te rëanga i nui ai te rerekëtanga i waenga i te wähine me te täne.

Kähore he ohoreretanga i te kite atu, he nui kë atu ngä tängata e möhio ana ki te whakarongo ki te reo, tënä i ngä tängata e matatau ana ki te körero. E 15 örau ngä pakeke Mäori (49,500) i kï, e 'pai' ana, e 'pai rawa atu' ana ränei tö rätau märama ki te reo e körerohia ana.

E tohu ana ngä tatauranga nei, he ähua köpipiri te körerotanga o te reo i ngä käinga me ngä hapori. Heoi, e kaha kë ana te hunga matatau ki te körero i te reo, i ngä takiwä reo Mäori pënä i te marae, i ngä hui, ä, i ngä röpü Mäori anö hoki.

He mea äta tautoko ngä kaupapa hei whakaora ake i te reo. Tërä töna 22 örau o ngä pakeke Mäori i kï, kua whai wähi rätau ki te äwhina kaupapa reo Mäori i roto i te 12 marama kua hori nei. Tërä anö ëtahi ähuatanga i tirohia i te rangahau nei, pënä i ngä huarahi i whäia e te tangata hei ako i te reo, me te whai wähi atu ki ngä whakaakoranga reo Mäori.

Hei te Paenga-whäwhä o 2002 ka whakaputahia ngä tatauranga whakamutunga.

Provisional Results from the 2001 Survey on the Health of the Maori Language: 2001

Provisional Results Released from the Survey on the Health of the Mäori Language

Provisional results from the Survey on the Health of the Mäori Language show that 42 per cent of Mäori aged 15 years and over (136,600 people) have some Mäori language skills. Te Puni Kökiri commissioned Statistics New Zealand to conduct this survey, which was undertaken during May and June 2001.

Nine per cent of Mäori adults could speak Mäori 'well' or 'very well', a further 33 per cent said they could speak Mäori 'fairly well' or 'not very well', while the remaining 58 per cent of Mäori said they could speak 'no more than a few words or phrases'. Analysis of the data by age group showed that high proficiency speaking skills are more likely in the older age groups, with 30 per cent of those aged 55 years and over saying they could speak Mäori 'well' or 'very well'.

However, there is some evidence that the proportion of younger people who are highly proficient at speaking Mäori is increasing, with 6 per cent of those aged 15-24 years reporting they could speak the language 'well' or 'very well', compared with 4 per cent of those aged 25-34 years. Young women, in particular, were more likely to report high proficiency skills than young men. Nine per cent of women aged 15-24 years said they could speak Mäori 'well' or 'very well', compared with 3 per cent of men in this age group. This age group showed the strongest gender difference.

Not surprisingly, the passive skill of listening was found to be stronger than the active skill of speaking. Fifteen per cent of adults (49,500 people) reported that they could understand spoken Mäori 'well' or 'very well'.

Survey results showed that use of Mäori language was limited in household and community environments. People were most likely to use their language skills in typical Mäori language domains such as on marae, at hui and within Mäori interest groups.

There was support for Mäori language revitalisation initiatives. Twenty-two per cent of Mäori adults reported they had helped or worked at one or more initiatives in the 12 months preceding the survey. Other topic areas covered in the survey included how people learnt to speak Mäori and participation in Mäori language education.

Final survey results are expected to be available in April 2002.

Also available in Te Reo Maöri version ? He Tatauranga Takitaro no te Rangahau i te Ora o te Reo Maori.

Brian Pink
Government Statistician
END


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Legendary Bassist David Friesen Plays Wellington’s Newest Jazz Venue

Friesen is touring New Zealand to promote his latest album Another Time, Another Place, recorded live at Auckland's Creative Jazz Club in 2015. More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Father - Descending Into The Depths of Dementia

Florian Zeller's dazzling drama The Father explores the effects of a deeply unsettling illness that affects 62,000 Kiwis, a number expected to grow to 102,000 by 2030. More>>


Howard Davis Review: Blade Runner Redivivus

When Ridley Scott's innovative, neo-noir, sci-fi flick Blade Runner was originally released in 1982, at a cost of over $45 million, it was a commercial bomb. More>>

14-21 October: New Zealand Improv Festival In Wellington

Imagined curses, Shibuya’s traffic, the apocalypse, and motherhood have little in common, but all these and more serve as inspiration for the eclectic improvised offerings coming to BATS Theatre this October for the annual New Zealand Improv Festival. More>>

ALSO:

Bird Of The Year Off To A Flying Start

The competition asks New Zealanders to vote for their favourite bird in the hopes of raising awareness of the threats they face. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
K Emma Ng's Old Asian, New Asian

This book, written by a young second-generation Chinese New Zealander, gives many examples of the racism that Asian New Zealanders experience. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION