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Appeal Over Controversial French Sex-Violence Film

Appeal To The High Court Re Classification Of Controversial French Sex-Violence Film Baise-Moi


The Society for Promotion of Community Standards Inc.

The Society for Promotion of Community Standards (SPCS) is to seek a judicial review of the recent classification decision of the Film and Literature Board of Review with respect to the controversial French film Baise Moi. The Board classified it R 18 and removed additional restrictions imposed on it in an earlier classification decision by the Office of Film and Literature Classification (OFLC).. SPCS President Gordon Dempsey says that “when the law is applied correctly this film must be classified as objectionable, and hence banned, for all ages, due to the repetitive juxtaposing of explicit sex and graphic violence. The overt glamorisation of extreme cruelty, revenge killings, criminal activity and obscenities is injurious to the public good. These activities tend to be promoted.”

Papers were filed in the High Court in Wellington at 4.15 pm today by Mr John Bryson, solicitor acting for the Society. Mr Peter McKenzie QC is counsel to the Society. Copies of Court papers were served today on the Secretary for Internal Affairs and Metropolis Films, the Distributor based in Auckland, which has exclusive rights of distribution to the film. An interim restriction order has been made under urgency to the High Court under s67 of the Films, Videos and Publications Classification Act 1993. The appeal has been made under s 58 of the Act. “A High Court hearing has been scheduled for Monday 8 April 2002 and media interest is expected to be intense,” said Mr Dempsey.

Ends


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