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2001 Census Snapshot 7 (Internal Migration)

Internal Migration
For the census usually resident population count aged 5 years and over.
Overview

Half of the people in New Zealand on census night 2001 had changed their usual address at least once since 1996, according to latest figures from Statistics New Zealand. People in the 25 to 29 year age range are particularly mobile, with 7 out of 10 having changed their usual address since 1996. In comparison, 3 out of 10 of those aged 70 to 79 years had changed their usual address since 1996.

The largest net gains from internal migration between 1996 and the 2001 Census were recorded for the Canterbury (8,685), Bay of Plenty (8,595), and Tasman (2,547) regions.
The Auckland Region had a net loss from internal migration of -2,364 for the same period. The largest net losses were in the Manawatu-Wanganui (-6,225), Southland (-5,424), and Taranaki (-3,654) regions.

The Canterbury Region had the largest net gain through internal migration between 1996 and 2001 for people of European ethnicity of 8,277, followed by the Bay of Plenty with 8,118. The largest net internal migration gain for people of Mäori ethnicity was recorded in the Waikato Region with 1,002, followed by Canterbury with 840. The Manawatu-Wanganui Region had the largest net internal migration loss for people of Mäori ethnicity of -999, followed by the Gisborne Region with -825.

1. Population mobility
1 in 2 people in New Zealand on census night 2001 had changed their usual address at least once since 1996.
More than half the people in the Bay of Plenty Region had changed their usual address since 1996. 4 in 10 people in Southland Region had changed their usual address since 1996.
7 in 10 of those aged 25 to 29 years had changed their usual address since 1996.
3 in 10 of those aged 70 to 79 years had changed their usual address since 1996.
1 in 14 people in New Zealand on census night 2001 lived overseas in 1996.
1 in 12 people aged 35 to 44 years at the 2001 Census lived overseas in 1996.

2. Age groups
The Auckland (7,473), Otago (4,080), Wellington (3,924) and Canterbury (3,348) regions had the largest net gains through internal migration between 1996 and the 2001 Census for the 15 to 24 year age group.
The Northland (-3,300), Hawke's Bay (-2,556), Southland (-2,400), Taranaki (-2,343) and Bay of Plenty (-2,328) regions had the largest net internal migration losses for the 15 to 24 year age group.
The Bay of Plenty (7,074), Canterbury (3,318), Tasman (2,049) and Northland (1,938) regions had the largest net internal migration gains for the 25 to 64 year age groups.
The Bay of Plenty Region (1,836) had the largest net internal migration gain for the 65 and over age group.
The Auckland Region had a net internal migration loss for people aged 30 years and over of -10,368.
The Wellington Region had a net internal migration loss for all people aged 35 years and over of -3,141.

3. Regional movements
The South Island had a net gain (from the North Island) of 5,439 people from internal migration between 1996 and the 2001 Census.
The largest net gains from internal migration between 1996 and the 2001 Census were in the Canterbury (8,685), Bay of Plenty (8,595), and Tasman (2,547) regions.
The largest net losses from internal migration between 1996 and the 2001 Census were in the Manawatu-Wanganui (-6,225), Southland (-5,424), and Taranaki (-3,654) regions.
The Auckland Region had a net loss from internal migration of -2,364 between 1996 and the 2001 Census compared with a net gain of 4,944 between 1991 and the1996 Census.
65,592 people in the Auckland Region at the 2001 Census specified that they lived in a different region in 1996.
The Wellington Region had a net gain from internal migration of 2,151 between 1996 and the 2001 Census compared with a net loss of -6,537 between the 1991 and the 1996 Census.
For the Canterbury Region, the largest net gains through internal migration between 1996 and the 2001 Census came from Southland (2,250), Otago (1,923) and the West Coast (1,260) regions, while there was a net loss to Wellington (-765).
For the Bay of Plenty Region, the largest net gains came from Auckland (2,520), Waikato (2,418) and Manawatu-Wanganui (1,353) regions.
For the Auckland Region, the largest net gains came Wellington (2,391) and Manawatu-Wanganui (1,293) regions, while there were net losses to Bay of Plenty (-2,520), Waikato (-2,007) and Northland (-1,083).

4. Ethnicity
The Canterbury Region had the largest net gain through internal migration between 1996 and 2001 for people of European ethnicity of 8,277, followed by the Bay of Plenty with 8,118.
The Waikato Region had the largest net internal migration gain for people of Mäori ethnicity of 1,002, followed by Canterbury with 840.
The Manawatu-Wanganui Region had the largest net internal migration loss for people of Mäori ethnicity of -999, followed by the Gisborne Region with -825. The Auckland Region had the largest net internal migration gain for people of Asian ethnicity (939).
The Wellington Region had the largest net internal migration loss for people of Pacific ethnicity of -372.
The Auckland Region had a net internal migration loss for people of European ethnicity of -3,921.

5. Work and qualifications
The Auckland Region had the largest net gain through internal migration between 1996 and the 2001 Census for adults in the labour force of 7,149, followed by Wellington with 4,998.
The Manawatu-Wanganui Region had the largest net internal migration loss for adults in the labour force of -6,846, followed by the Southland Region with -3,489.
The Otago Region had the largest net internal migration gain for adults not in the labour force of 3,687, followed by the Canterbury Region of 2,862.
The Auckland Region had the largest net internal migration loss for adults not in the labour force of -7,014, followed by the Wellington Region with -1,896.
The Otago Region had the largest net internal migration gain for adults with a school qualification as their highest qualification with 4,416.
The Bay of Plenty Region had the largest net internal migration gain for adults with a vocational qualification as their highest qualification with 1,782.
The Otago Region had the largest net internal migration loss for adults with a degree as their highest qualification with -3,162.

6. Urban and rural
'Other rural' areas had the largest net gain through internal migration between 1996 and the 2001 Census of 19,893. Minor urban areas had a net internal migration loss of -12,858.
Rural centres had a net internal migration loss of -4,776.
Secondary urban areas had a net internal migration loss of -3,624.
Main urban areas had a net internal migration gain of 2,280.

More information
These results come from the 2001 Census of Population and Dwellings conducted by Statistics New Zealand.
For further detailed information on this subject, contact the people named below.
This release and other 2001 Census releases, along with additional information, are available free on the Statistics New Zealand website www.stats.govt.nz under "Census 2001". You are welcome to reproduce and publish this information provided you acknowledge Statistics New Zealand as the source.
The counts for this 2001 Census Snapshot are taken from tables prepared for the Population Structure and Internal Migration topic-based series report to be published at the end of May 2002. These are available at www.stats.govt.nz/census.
To discuss the availability of further information from the 2001 Census or other collections, contact our Information Centre by telephoning:

Ends

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