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English-Maori Health And Safety Glossary Released

Tue, 27 Aug 2002

English-Maori Health And Safety Glossary Released

The Occupational Safety and Health Service (OSH) of the Department of Labour has produced The English-Maori Glossary of Occupational Safety and Health terms.

"This glossary has been created as there are many diseases and injuries arising from work, and causing harm to workers, that have technical definitions which are not directly translatable," said Bob Hill, OSH General Manager.

"This is a unique resource, developed in response to a need identified by Maori. It is a significant step by OSH to translate its working language into Maori."

The glossary contains more than 200 common words and phrases drawn from occupational safety and health legislation, codes of practice, guidelines and other publications. The definitions are given in English, then in Maori. In some cases, line drawings are included to make the meanings clearer.

"It reflects the Service's wish to provide information on the workplace hazards that cause harm to workers in a form that is best understood by different groups," said Mr Hill

The translations were by Piripi Walker, a Maori language translator, teacher and publisher, and Heni Jacob of Huatau Consultants, a Maori language consultant with extensive experience in translating educational and corporate material.

In translating the terms and definitions into Maori, the general practice has been to use words already in common use among native speakers. In some cases, new words have been coined specifically for this glossary and approved by Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Maori (the Maori Language Commission).

For example, metal fume fever, mate au konganuku, is formed as a compound noun from three words: illness, fumes and metal. Such words and their definitions will be included in a major all-Maori dictionary being compiled by Te Taura Whiri.

The translations in the glossary were overseen and approved by Lee Smith and Dr Pat Hohepa of Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Maori. The Te Taura Whiri logo appears on the cover as a "mark of excellence".

"Our hope is that the glossary will be widely used by English-Maori translators; Maori safety and health professionals; and Mäori language teachers, speakers and learners - and anyone with an interest in the "language" of safety and health," said Mr Hill.

The glossary is available from all OSH regional offices and can also be downloaded from the OSH web site at http://www.osh.dol.govt.nz/order/catalogue/pdf/maori-glossary.pdf

Ends


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