News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

RNZCGP membership survey 2003

RNZCGP membership survey 2003

The primary health care strategy has initiated major changes in the funding and structure of general practice and primary care.

Many general practitioners have joined Primary Health Organisations since their inception 18 months ago; two thirds (184/268, 69%) of the respondents either belonged to, or intended to join, a PHO.

“The fast take up of PHO membership was prompted in part by expected funding improvements, economic necessity and the apparent lack of a viable alternative,” College president Dr Jim Vause said.

The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners’ 2003 membership survey, provides a September 2003 snapshot of GP’s views on workforce issues, as they adapt to new conditions driven by the primary health care strategy and the formation of PHOs.

The survey’s response rate was 54% (268/500 randomly selected College members) with a ±6% margin of error at the 95% confidence level. Although slightly more female than male GPs answered the survey, respondents were representative of the whole sample with respect to age, ethnicity, practice location and place of qualification.

While some respondents were enthusiastic about their changing work conditions, over a third (117/268, 44%) found the administration and paperwork associated with continual change particularly stressful. Respondents said that the “bureaucratic burden” was increasing but not remunerated. Nevertheless, some described the clinical nature of general practice (such as consulting with patients) as a continued source of job satisfaction.

Other key points:

Just over half the respondents were male (150/268, 56%)

Nearly three-quarters (190/268, 71%) identified themselves as ‘New Zealand European’

Most respondents’ principal medical work was as a general practitioner, either full-time (158/268, 59%) or part-time (48/268, 18%)

Over half (149/268, 56%) had worked as a GP for more than 14 years

About half (150/268, 56%) spent 30 to 44 hours per week consulting in general practice (excluding on call)

Nearly all (251/268, 94%) participated in weekly continuing medical education and professional development activities

A third (82/268, 31%) spent time educating other health professionals each week.

Over three-quarters (208/268, 78%) of the respondents were working in group practices. The majority (222/268, 83%) were in urban practices. Most (193/268, 72%) believed there was adequate primary and secondary health care support available for their practices.

Around half (131/268, 49%) specified a general practitioner to patient ratio between 1:1500–2499. By comparison, the Ministry of Health1 states that the average New Zealand doctor to patient ratio is 1:1230.

Half (132/268, 49%) of the respondents indicated that they intend to change their work situation (in some way) over the next four years; they mentioned either changing the number of hours they worked in general practice, or retiring, or taking up alternative medical work.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis Review: Reclaiming The N-Word - Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman

Black resistance to institutional racism in the US has a long, tangled, and traumatic intellectual history. Although we may have assumed much too easily that white supremacists like David Duke had become marginalised as a political force, in reality they never really disappeared ... More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Minstrel in The Gallery - Sam Hunt's Selected Poems

Perhaps the most striking aspect of Sam Hunt's poetry is its quality of urgent authenticity. Encountering this latest compilation, the reader is immediately struck by its easy accessibility, tonal sincerity, and lack of linguistic pretension ... More>>

A Matter Of Fact: Truth In A Post-Truth World

How do we convincingly explain the difference between good information and misinformation? And conversely, how do we challenge our own pre-conceived notions of what we believe to be true? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: The Road To Unfreedom

Valerie Morse: Yale professor of history Tim Snyder publishes a stunning account of the mechanisms of contemporary Russian power in US and European politics. In telling this story he presents both startling alarms for our own society and some mechanisms of resistance. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland