News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Treatments for Arthritis


22 February 2005

Treatments for Arthritis

There is a lot of speculation about the side-effects of conventional treatments for arthritis, therefore the Malaghan Institute is endeavouring to develop a novel non-steroidal treatment.

There are currently more than 100 degenerative diseases that fall under the umbrella of arthritis. Arthritis knows no age barrier affecting both the young and the elderly. Unfortunately, the disease states are poorly understood making it difficult to find a cure. It is widely recognised however, that inflammation plays a key role in arthritis causing irreparable damage to the joints.

The Arthritis Research Group, headed by Dr Jacquie Harper, intends to set up a clinical research programme aimed at identifying the factors involved in the onset, duration and resolution of inflammation in arthritis attacks.

The study will profile the inflammatory response of healthy volunteers and arthritis patients following a localised exposure to the causative agent in crystal-induced arthritis. This ‘arthritis model’ will allow the research team to determine important differences between the way healthy and susceptible individuals respond to inflammatory stimuli. Using this information it will be possible to identify new targets for prevention and disease management.

The clinical research programme will also link in with the Arthritis Research Group’s anti-inflammatory drug discovery programme with a focus on the development of novel anti-inflammatory agents from New Zealand biota, such as marine sponges. The lead candidate from the discovery programme will be tested using our clinical arthritis model as part of the Phase I clinical trial process for the development of a new treatment for arthritis.

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Howard Davis Article: A Musical Axis - Brahms, Wagner, Sibelius

Brahms' warm and exquisitely subtle Symphony No. 3 in F major, Wagner's irrepressibly sentimental symphonic poem Siegfried Idyll, and Sibelius' chilling and immensely challenging Violin Concerto in D minor exemplify distinct stages of development in a tangled and convoluted series of skirmishes that came to define subsequent disputes about the nature of post-Romantic orchestral writing well into the following century. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: A Pale Ghost Writer

Reviewed by Ruth Brassington, Richard Flanagan's new novel is about a novelist hastily ghost-writing the biography of a crook about to go to trial. The reader is kept on a cliff-edge, as the narrator tries to get blood out of his stone man. More>>

Negotiations Begin: Equal Conditions For Men & Women In Professional Football

The trade union representing New Zealand's professional footballers has initiated bargaining for an agreement securing equal terms and conditions for men and women. If negotiated, it will be the first agreement of its kind in the world. More>>

ALSO:


New Zealand Wars Commemoration: Witi Ihimaera's Sleeps Standing Moetū

The second of several articles to mark Rā Maumahara, remembering the New Zealand Land Wars. The first was a Q&A with Vincent O’Malley, author of The Great War for New Zealand: Waikato 1800–2000. More>>

ALSO:


Howard Davis Review: Conflict & Resistance - Ria Hall's Rules of Engagement

From the aftermath of war through colonisation to her own personal convictions, Hall's new CD addresses current issues and social problems on multiple levels, confirming her position as a polemical and preeminent voice on the indigenous NZ music scene. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland