News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Prevention is No. 1 with Diabetes

PRESS STATEMENT


NEW ZEALAND ARTIFICIAL LIMB BOARD


Prevention is No. 1 with Diabetes

“We heartily support the theme of Diabetes Awareness Week (Tuesday 22 – Monday 28 November) with its emphasis on prevention and footcare,” says Graeme Hall, Chair of the New Zealand Artificial Limb Board (NZALB). “The International Diabetes Federation says ‘through good healthcare and informed self care, it is possible to prevent diabetes-related amputations in the majority of cases’. We would be delighted if prevention measures were so successful that we had no new diabetic patients at all. As it is, over 500 of our amputees have lost limbs because of diabetes.

“For them, all the messages in Diabetes Awareness Week apply - ongoing care, daily checks and careful hygiene to do everything possible to stay healthy. Being active keeps the muscles firmly toned and exercised, which helps towards maintaining the fit of the socket.”

Those who do become amputees can take comfort from the service of the NZALB, which is generally free to New Zealanders. It has highly trained staff (clinical prosthetists, surgeons, and physiotherapists) who work as a team with the amputee to get the best possible outcomes. A positive attitude goes a long way, and the service has many excellent role models to help people take up their lives again with an artificial limb.

“We are proud to work with notable athletes, such as Katie Horan, world recording holding sprinter for 400 metres at the Canadian Paralympic Championships, and Peter Horne, international bowls representative, both of Wellington. But our main focus is helping people with amputations to quietly get on with their lives - working, running a home, gardening, doing the shopping, just the ordinary, everyday things,” says Mr Hall.

To do this, the New Zealand Artificial Limb Board uses a wide range of tools and machinery in making limbs, and is right up with the latest digital technology, somewhat similar to that used by Weta Workshops.

Although the plastercast method remains the method of choice for some fittings, the use of digital imaging is growing. This method is cleaner and more convenient for the amputees. A series of cameras mounted on a hexagonal “T-ring” produces a laser tracing of the amputee’s stump. The prosthetist then modifies the image on screen and e-mails it direct to an automatic carver that carves a duplicate stump from a polystyrene block. The prosthetist uses this to shape an individualised socket that fits over the patient’s stump and to which the artificial leg is attached.

“It means that the image can be taken in an instant, as opposed to half an hour or more for the plastercast method,” says Mr Hall. “Our patients like it, and of course, it is a much cleaner process for them too. The carver is also compatible with an orthotics software package and we understand that software for cranial masks is also being developed.”

The carver is situated centrally in Wellington Limb Centre, which services the other four Limb Centres - Auckland, Hamilton, Christchurch and Dunedin.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Legendary Bassist David Friesen Plays Wellington’s Newest Jazz Venue

Friesen is touring New Zealand to promote his latest album Another Time, Another Place, recorded live at Auckland's Creative Jazz Club in 2015. More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Father - Descending Into The Depths of Dementia

Florian Zeller's dazzling drama The Father explores the effects of a deeply unsettling illness that affects 62,000 Kiwis, a number expected to grow to 102,000 by 2030. More>>


Howard Davis Review: Blade Runner Redivivus

When Ridley Scott's innovative, neo-noir, sci-fi flick Blade Runner was originally released in 1982, at a cost of over $45 million, it was a commercial bomb. More>>

14-21 October: New Zealand Improv Festival In Wellington

Imagined curses, Shibuya’s traffic, the apocalypse, and motherhood have little in common, but all these and more serve as inspiration for the eclectic improvised offerings coming to BATS Theatre this October for the annual New Zealand Improv Festival. More>>

ALSO:

Bird Of The Year Off To A Flying Start

The competition asks New Zealanders to vote for their favourite bird in the hopes of raising awareness of the threats they face. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Jenny Abrahamson's John & Charles Enys: Castle Hill Runholders, 1864-1891

This volume will be of interest to a range of readers interested in the South Island high country, New Zealand’s natural environment, and the history of science. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION