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Nioxin Uses Head To Help Cancer Patients

26 January 2006

Nioxin Uses Head To Help Cancer Patients

It is traumatic enough to be diagnosed with cancer but for many people and women in particular, losing hair as a result of chemotherapy or radiotherapy treatment is another vicious blow and something that affects self esteem dramatically. To some women, the possibility of losing their hair is worse than the thought of losing a breast.

Grace Essential Haircare in conjunction with Haircreations are delighted to be able to launch a Free Nioxin Starter Pack Programme in February 2006 to help chemotherapy patients, before, during and after chemotherapy. Patients will receive a free Starter Kit valued at over $80 to help them during this traumatic time.

The core science of all Nioxin products is based on improving the appearance of the hair and scalp and the product is used widely overseas with chemotherapy patients to help maintain a healthy scalp environment while undergoing treatment.

Geoff Grace, Managing Director of Grace Essential Haircare; distributor of Nioxin products, said that it was something he and his wife Jo very much wanted to do.

"One of our first objectives when we took this business over in 2003 was to ultimately be in a position to be able to give something back to the community. We could not think of a better way than to support people who are going through chemotherapy and we are delighted to be able to start this free programme in 2006."

People who are well don't realize the major effect hair loss can have on women emotionally.

"Nothing prepared me for the devastation of losing my hair. On a scale of 1-10, it ranked at the top, right alongside cancer. You can hide cancer, but you cannot hide hair loss. Hair loss is associated with cancer. I knew it would happen. What I was not prepared for,was it happening." -Pat

"Losing my hair was almost worse than hearing that I had cancer." -Mary

"Losing my hair was far worse than losing my breasts because I felt I looked like I was dying when in reality I was trying so hard to stay alive." -Jewel

The Free Nioxin Starter Kit programme will be launched on 01 February, in Auckland. Patients undergoing chemotherapy will be able to fill out a referral form when they attend Haircreations for a wig fitting. They will then be given a free consultation at the Nioxin clinic in Milford and shown how to improve the appearance of their hair and scalp environment during a life-changing event such as chemotherapy treatment. At this time they will be given their free Starter Kit valued at over $80.

Geoff Grace said, "We know that hair loss is devastating. Patients are given a grant for a free wig when they are likely to lose their hair through chemotherapy. We will be running this free programme in conjunction with Haircreations, who are the largest supplier of wigs to chemotherapy patients in New Zealand.

This way we can get to the people who need it the most and help them to create an optimum scalp environment, whilst the wig is being worn, so their hair can grow to its healthiest and fullest potential. Haircreations have been working with medical and genetic related hairloss for men, women and children for 21 years, including attending the Look Good Feel Better workshops where they show patients how to use wigs and turbans. Once we have the programme up and running in Auckland, we will look at taking it to the rest of the centres in New Zealand. We want to be able to help as many people as we can."

Success stories:

"It is now 15 weeks and 5 chemotherapy treatments since receiving that diagnosis and I STILL HAVE MY HAIR. Thanks to Nioxin." - Jenny G. Christchurch

"My hair has become more manageable and there are fewer breakages ...there has been a lot of new growth, particularly where there were bare patches behind my ears and at my temples" - Elsie K. Whakatane

ENDS

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