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Dig deep for hospice

Dig deep for hospice

THE Kerikeri public is being encouraged to hold a Time to Remember this May to help ensure hospice care remains free for all New Zealanders.

Hospice Bay of Islands is one of 38 which come under Hospice New Zealand's umbrella. It provides free palliative care to people living with terminal illness, while also supporting family/whanau and friends.

All hospices have joined forces for the national appeal, which aims to raise more than $500,000 this year.

The public can get behind the appeal by either holding a Time to Remember event or making a donation in their appeal envelope when it is delivered to all households between May 14-21.

The Time to Remember itself gives people the chance to hold dinner parties, brunches, lunches - anything involving food. Their guests are asked to make a donation and all money raised goes to hospice.

People keen to hold an event need to register by visiting www.time-to-remember.org.nz, phoning 0800 TIME4FUN (846 343) or their local hospice. They will then be sent a Time to Remember host album full of recipes written by celebrity chef and hospice ambassador Jo Seagar, as well as invitations.

The recipes, accompanied by photos, range from ideas for brunch, picnics, barbecues and salads to dips and nibbles, desserts and even cocktails.

Money raised from Time to Remember events will help top up hospices' funding. They are partially Government funded but rely heavily on community fundraising to cover running costs.

"There are many people in our community in need of free hospice care," says Hospice New Zealand president Dalton Kelly.

"You only have to visit a hospice or speak to someone with a hospice connection to see the impact this specialist care has on patients, their families/whanau and friends. It really helps them to make the most of life."

For more details about hospice visit www.hospice.org.nz or call your local hospice.


ENDS


Dig deep for hospice

THE Northland public is being encouraged to hold a Time to Remember this May to help ensure hospice care remains free for all New Zealanders.

Kaipara Hospice is one of 38 which come under Hospice New Zealand's umbrella. It provides free palliative care to people living with terminal illness, while also supporting family/whanau and friends.

All hospices have joined forces for the national appeal, which aims to raise more than $500,000 this year.

The public can get behind the appeal by either holding a Time to Remember event or making a donation in their appeal envelope when it is delivered to all households between May 14-21.

The Time to Remember itself gives people the chance to hold dinner parties, brunches, lunches - anything involving food. Their guests are asked to make a donation and all money raised goes to hospice.

People keen to hold an event need to register by visiting www.time-to-remember.org.nz, phoning 0800 TIME4FUN (846 343) or their local hospice. They will then be sent a Time to Remember host album full of recipes written by celebrity chef and hospice ambassador Jo Seagar, as well as invitations.

The recipes, accompanied by photos, range from ideas for brunch, picnics, barbecues and salads to dips and nibbles, desserts and even cocktails.

Money raised from Time to Remember events will help top up hospices' funding. They are partially Government funded but rely heavily on community fundraising to cover running costs.

"There are many people in our community in need of free hospice care," says Hospice New Zealand president Dalton Kelly.

"You only have to visit a hospice or speak to someone with a hospice connection to see the impact this specialist care has on patients, their families/whanau and friends. It really helps them to make the most of life."

For more details about hospice visit www.hospice.org.nz or call your local hospice.


ENDS


FACTBOX

- Hospice New Zealand figures show more than 8000 new patients and their families receive help from hospices each year.

- An AC Nielsen survey shows many New Zealanders still don't know what a hospice service does or what palliative care is.

- Hospice New Zealand figures show volunteers themselves gave up more than $4 million worth of their time to the country's hospices in a single year.

- Hospices provide services based on their community's needs. These services may include inpatient and community care, bereavement care, counselling and spiritual care, day-stay care, respite care and equipment hire.

- Care is provided mostly at home though the inpatient unit is used for symptom control and pain management, respite care or terminal care.

- Hospices are for everyone, regardless of age, race, religion or their ability to pay. Ninety percent have cancer but patients with other terminal illnesses also receive care.


You can help your hospice by:

- Being a Time to Remember host or a donating guest
- Making a donation or bequest
- Offering practical help as a volunteer
- Telling your friends and colleagues about hospice
- Taking part in local fundraising activities
- Supporting local hospice charity shops

ENDS

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