News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search


Campaigners Claim Victory For Hen Layer Hens


Campaigners Claim Victory For Hen Layer Hens

All layer hens in New Zealand are likely to have a better way of life after a parliamentary committee recognised that the current Code of Welfare was a sham and ordered a rewrite.

Animal Rights Legal Advocacy Network (ARLAN) complained to the Regulations Review Committee that the code did not comply with the Animal Welfare Act. This Act recommends that animals should be able to display normal patterns of behaviour.

The committee agreed and recommended the code be sent back to National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC), who originally wrote the code.

Campaign Against Factory Farming (CAFF) spokesperson Debra Ashton says the decision by the multi-party committee is "a victory for common sense and sound science", and she hopes it will lead to a complete phase out of battery hen cages.

"Hopefully NAWAC will do their job properly this time, although it is highly unlikely a new code would call for an immediate ban.

"In the interim, CAFF are urging all members of parliament to support the Consumer'’s Right to Know (Food Information) Bill.

"If this bill goes ahead, it is hoped it will help lessen the number of battery hens sooner, as it would require eggs from caged hens to be labelled appropriately as free range and barn eggs are.

"The public have been misled by false advertising on egg cartons carrying labels that bring up images of hens happily grazing on green pastures. With accurate labelling, consumers will be able to immediately see what they are buying."

The bill, introduced to parliament by Green Party Member Sue Kedgley, also includes more accurate labelling on whether food contains GE ingredients and which country the food actually comes from.

Currently in New Zealand, about 3 million hens live in cages that don’t allow them to walk, stretch their wings, peck, scratch or dust bathe.

"These are most unnatural conditions which show no regard for their welfare," says Ms Ashton.

The code for pigs is also to come under similar scrutiny with about 30 percent of pig farmers still using sow stalls in which the animals cannot even turn around.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


Arts Festival: An Evening With Richard Dawkins

In a special one-off, New Zealand event at the Michael Fowler Centre, Dawkins will reflect on his eminent career as a scientist, and expand on the themes of inspiration, influence and ideas in his recent memoir, Brief Candle in the Dark: My Life in Science. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Worldly And Unworldly

"Being Magdalene" by Fleur Beale The situations shown in this youth novel are shocking, scary, and very moving as we experience Magdalene’s struggle to be a perfect girl as defined by the cruel and unreasonable leader of “The Children of the Faith”, as she moves reluctantly into young womanhood. More>>

Whistle Stop: Netball NZ To Implement New INF Rules

Netball New Zealand (NNZ) will implement the new Official Rules of Netball, as set down by the International Netball Federation (INF), from January 1, 2016. Key changes include the elimination of whistle following a goal, amendments to injury time and changes to setting a penalty. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Waiata Aroha

Vaughan Rapatahana on Chappy by Patricia Grace: With this eminently readable novel Patricia Grace returns to the full-length fiction stage after a hiatus of ten years. More>>

'Ithaca' At Q Theatre: Introducing NZ's World Class Cirque Troupe

NZ’s very own cirque troupe is set to become a household name with the premier of its adaptation of Homer’s Odyssey having secured a key season in Auckland. More>>

Music Awards: The Tuis Are Broody This Year

Topping off a sensationally eventful year both at home and internationally, Nelson born brother-sister duo Broods has taken home four Tuis from this year’s 50th annual Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards. More>>


Sport: Richie McCaw Retires From Rugby

Richie McCaw has today confirmed he is hanging up his boots and retiring from professional rugby. The 34-year-old All Blacks captain and most capped All Black of all time has drawn the curtain on his stunning international career which started in Dublin 14 years ago, almost to the day, and ended in London last month when he hoisted the Webb Ellis Cup aloft for the second time. More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news