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Netballers Roll Up Sleeves


Netballers Roll Up Sleeves

The National Bank Cup netball semi-finalists are armed with an important community message during this weekend’s two play-off matches: Give Blood.

The Ascot Park Hotel Southern Sting host the Waikato-Bay of Plenty Magic, supported by Sleepyhead, in Invercargill tonight and the Fujifilm Force are at home to the Ballantynes Canterbury Flames on the North Shore this Sunday.

The players from all four teams will wear temporary tattoos on their arms featuring the New Zealand Blood Service logo to show their support for blood donation. Their action follows on from Wednesday’s World Blood Donor Day, a global celebration to thank and attract blood donors.

NZBS CEO Dr Graeme Benny says less than 5% of New Zealanders give blood, but a staggering 80% of Kiwis will need blood or blood products during their lifetime.

Every week the NZBS needs to collect more than 3,000 whole blood donations to meet the needs of patients throughout New Zealand. The service generally has just enough blood stocks to meet demand and that situation is becoming dire as the number of regular donors continues to fall.

Netball New Zealand Chief Executive Shelley McMeeken says she is encouraged the country’s elite netballers are highlighting such a worthy cause.

“It is great to see the National Bank Cup teams helping to promote such a vital community message,” McMeeken said. “Just one blood donation can save up to three lives, so it’s a really important cause.”

Players from National Bank Cup teams dropped into their local Donor Centres on Wednesday to mix and mingle with donors and thank them for their efforts.

Ends

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