News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Self-Medicating a Concern in CAM Industry

Wednesday 16th August 2006


PRESS STATEMENT
For Immediate Release


Self-Medicating a Concern in CAM Industry


Users of complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) in New Zealand are choosing to self-medicate rather than seek advice from a specialist in natural medicine. A recent study into the use of CAM by Waikato University of emergency department patients at Waikato Hospital revealed that one in three respondents used CAM. Alarmingly however, the most common source of information on the use of CAM was friends and family (47.3%) rather than a qualified natural health practitioner.

“There is a wealth of information in the public arena about healthcare including natural medicines and consumers have unprecedented levels of choice around the types of services they receive and the medicines they take,” said Jenny Cookson, Director of the Canterbury College of Natural Medicine. “While it is important to protect consumer choice and access to products that may be beneficial to health, this must be tempered with an understanding of the safety considerations that occur when ingesting any substance of therapeutic value in a therapeutic dose.”

The study also identified that two thirds of respondents purchased natural health products from sources other than a specialist practitioner. Many supplements and remedies are readily available in pharmacies, supermarkets and on-line which encourages self-medication, however it is important for CAM users with significant medical concerns to consult a qualified professional prior to purchasing such products. Cookson believes “Consultation with a qualified natural medicine practitioner will ensure that the best health results are achieved in the safest manner. This is especially true when dealing with complex medical conditions and concomitant pharmaceutical usage.”

The Canterbury College of Natural Medicine delivers professional qualifications in natural medicine. Students receive clinical training in the College Clinic under the supervision of senior clinical tutors and practice along side professional practitioners. The College and Clinic have been training students to become professional practitioners in natural medicine since 1994 and has a reputation for academic and clinical excellence.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: Almost Getting Away With Murder

The Black Widow by Lee-Anne Cartier: Lee-Anne Cartier is the sister of the Christchurch man found to have been murdered by his wife, Helen Milner, after an initial assumption by police that his death, in 2009, was suicide. More>>

Howard Davis: Triple Echo - The Malevich/Reinhardt/Hotere Nexus

Howard Davis: The current juxtaposition of works by Ralph Hotere and Ad Reinhardt at Te Papa perfectly exemplifies Jean Michel Massing's preoccupation with the transmigration of imagery in a remarkable triple echo effect... More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Nō Tāu Manawa

Vaughan Rapatahana responds to Fale Aitu | Spirit House by Tusiata Avi.
More>>

9 Golds - 21 Medals: NZ Team Celebrates As Rio 2016 Paralympic Games Close

The entire New Zealand Paralympic Team, led by kiwi sprinter and double gold medallist Liam Malone as flag bearer, are on the bus to the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro for the Closing Ceremony of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games. There, they will celebrate the fantastic successes of the past 10 days. More>>

ALSO:

New Zealand Improv Festival: The Festival Of Moments To Return To The Capital

The eighth incarnation of the New Zealand Improv Festival comes to BATS Theatre this 4-8 October , with a stellar line-up of spontaneous theatre and instant comedy performed and directed by top improvisors from around New Zealand and the world. More>>

ALSO:

CDF Tim Keating: NZ Somme Centenary

"Our generals also knew what to expect, and they built that knowledge into their planning. Each of the four set-piece attacks was fought with a single brigade, with the expectation that the brigade would be used up. A fresh brigade would then be brought up to conduct the next set-piece..." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news