News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Oral Submission to Inquiry into Obesity, Diabetes

Media release - (Embargoed Until 1030 hrs)

Wednesday 11 October


Oral Submission to the Health Committee on the Inquiry into Obesity and Type Two Diabetes.


Today Professor Barry Taylor and Dr Nikki Blair presented an oral submission to the health committee on behalf of the Paediatric Society of New Zealand.

The Paediatric Society is a multi disciplinary organisation of over 400 health professionals. They believe all children have the right to attain optimum physical, mental and social health and well being.

In 2003 the rates of overweight and obese children had reached 30% in New Zealand. This mirrors that in most OECD countries.

The rapid escalation of childhood obesity poses major problems both in childhood but also is a costly and major threat to long term adult health.

The Paediatric Society urges the NZ government and regional authorities, as well as NGO’s, DHBs and all citizens to act to address this issue now.

The evidence base for effective intervention to prevent or treat childhood obesity is not well developed. In this context, it is important that as much attention is paid to evaluation and research into effective programs as it is to plan and put in place a co-ordinated national strategy. If this is not done, potentially a lot of money will be wasted and we will not learn from the experience. It is important to develop programmes which are effective for Maori and Pacific families, as prevalence of over-weight and obesity, and the consequences thereof, appear larger in this group.

Overseas experience is that multi-faceted family based programmes involving nutrition, exercise, reduction in sedentary activity and behavioural components are effective in weight management, with the key being a motivated family and child. Such a programme requires an intense collaborative service comprising of dietary, activity, medical and behavioural expertise and at least 6 months duration. At the time of a national review of programmes addressing the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity conducted in 2004 by Dr Nikki Blair, only a few DHBs had access to a multi-faceted weight management programme, most had insufficient resources and funding to provide all the components, the intensity of intervention, or the capacity to meet the needs of their communities, or the ability to adequately evaluate the efficacy of their programme.

The Society believes a national system of evaluating and monitoring, with the ability to integrate research to allow us to learn rapidly what works and what doesn’t, is needed.

It suggests for the purpose of monitoring, integrating into the well child check and immunisation or hearing and vision screening events at 4 and 11 years the routine measuring of height, weight and waist measurement. These values could be reported into a national database (linked to the immunisation database) so we can monitor down to a DHB level.

Considering the difficulties of weight management in children as in adults, it is essential that much of the national strategy focus on prevention and community wide interventions.

At a Public Health level we think society is now obliged to restrict advertising of “energy dense” (fatty and sugary) food and drinks to children.

At a community level, we support the plan that there be regulations adopted by schools around appropriate food and drinks consumed at publicly funded schools in New Zealand.

Finally – there needs to be changes to the environment which is currently ‘obesogenic’ in that it encourages the intake of energy dense food and low activity levels. There is a responsibility for planners and architects at governmental, regional and city council level to ensure that the environments we live in encourage healthy living. Our public buildings, streets and facilities need to be designed and/or modified to encourage and enable increased activity including active transport (walking and cycling) to work and school, use of stairs and improved access to all to sporting facilities and parks. Improved access to healthy foods in particular vegetables, fruit and milk, especially for low-income families, could be improved with Government subsidies.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

NZ On Air TV Funding: More Comedy Comes Out Of The Shadows

Paranormal Event Response Unit is a series conceived by Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi as a TV spin-off from their highly acclaimed feature film What We Do In The Shadows. More>>

ALSO:

Mars News: Winners Announced For The 2016 Apra Silver Scroll Awards

Wellington singer-songwriter and internationally acclaimed musician Thomas Oliver has won the 2016 APRA Silver Scroll Award with his captivating love song ‘If I Move To Mars’. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Salt River Songs by Sam Hunt

Colin Hogg, a longtime comrade of Sam, writes in his Introduction that, ‘There is a lot of death in this collection of new poems by my friend Sam Hunt. It’s easier to count the poems here that don’t deal with the great destroyer than it is to point to the ones that do.’ More>>

Electronica: Restoring The World’s First Recorded Computer Music

University of Canterbury Distinguished Professor Jack Copeland and UC alumni and composer Jason Long have restored the earliest known recording of computer-generated music, created more than 65 years ago using programming techniques devised by Alan Turing. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Almost Getting Away With Murder

The Black Widow by Lee-Anne Cartier: Lee-Anne Cartier is the sister of the Christchurch man found to have been murdered by his wife, Helen Milner, after an initial assumption by police that his death, in 2009, was suicide. More>>

Howard Davis: Triple Echo - The Malevich/Reinhardt/Hotere Nexus

Howard Davis: The current juxtaposition of works by Ralph Hotere and Ad Reinhardt at Te Papa perfectly exemplifies Jean Michel Massing's preoccupation with the transmigration of imagery in a remarkable triple echo effect... More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news