News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Bishop Randerson: Radiation Therapists Strike

Media Release
10 January 2007

Radiation Therapists Strike

From Bishop Richard Randerson, Dean of Holy Trinity Cathedral, Auckland

Moral failure in system that allows a pay claim to prejudice the lives of cancer and other sufferers Work should resume at once pending Government or other third party intervention.

“In a country like New Zealand that prides itself on its care for all its people, it is intolerable that some should run the risk of dying because of a strike over pay,” says Bishop Richard Randerson, Dean of Holy Trinity Anglican Cathedral in Auckland.

“There is a fundamental moral failure in a system that allows strike action over a pay claim that prejudices the lives of cancer sufferers, or others in need of radiation therapy. Delays in treatment put at serious risk those for whom timely therapy is a matter of life and death. In addition to the stress of illness, there is the added stress of anxiety and uncertainty for both sufferers and their families. A system that fails to discern the priority of the importance of human wellbeing ahead of finance is morally deficient.

“The reasons for the strike are complex and not for detailed assessment by a lay-person. They include issues such as levels of training and expertise, comparative rates of remuneration, matters of recruitment and retention of staff, and the adequacy of government funding of health services. They appear to lie beyond the capacity of the parties involved in the pay claims to resolve by themselves.

“The humane and responsible step is for work to resume at once so that patients may immediately have secure access to life-saving therapies. The next priority might be for a third party to make an independent assessment of the situation and to make recommendations. Ultimately it is the responsibility of Government to ensure that essential services are provided to citizens, and government initiatives to this end would seem essential. Professional and systemic morality should put people first, and this sense of ultimate purpose needs to be recovered.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Memorabilia: Te Papa Buys Peter Snell Singlet

Te Papa has purchased the singlet worn by Peter Snell at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics at an auction this morning at Cordy’s auction house in Auckland. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Women At The Centre

In the first chapter of her epic History of New Zealand Women, Barbara Brookes places a version of the Māori creation story alongside that of the Pākehā colonists, setting the scene for how each society saw women. The contrast is startling. More>>

In Auckland Art Gallery: A Tour Of Duty

I had already started my journey through the exhibited collections when an audio announcement about a guided tour to embark shortly from the foyer was made, I decided to join in. Why not? More>>

Art: ‘Holiday’ Wins IHC Art Awards

An intricate embroidered cushion by Wellington artist Jo-Anne Tapiki has won the 2016 IHC Art Awards and $5000. Jo-Anne started working from IHC’s Arts on High studio in Lower Hutt 18 months ago and this is the first time she has entered the competition. More>>

‘Quasi’: Christchurch Art Gallery Reveals Rooftop Sculpture

Christchurch-born and internationally renowned artist Ronnie van Hout has had a huge hand in Christchurch Art Gallery's latest outdoor installation. More>>

Obituary: Last 28th Maori Battalion A Company Veteran Dies

Charlie Petera, the final surviving member of A-Company of the 28th Maori Battalion has died at his home in Ngataki, Northland last night surrounded by his whanau. He was 91 years old. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news