News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Bishop Randerson: Radiation Therapists Strike

Media Release
10 January 2007

Radiation Therapists Strike

From Bishop Richard Randerson, Dean of Holy Trinity Cathedral, Auckland

Moral failure in system that allows a pay claim to prejudice the lives of cancer and other sufferers Work should resume at once pending Government or other third party intervention.

“In a country like New Zealand that prides itself on its care for all its people, it is intolerable that some should run the risk of dying because of a strike over pay,” says Bishop Richard Randerson, Dean of Holy Trinity Anglican Cathedral in Auckland.

“There is a fundamental moral failure in a system that allows strike action over a pay claim that prejudices the lives of cancer sufferers, or others in need of radiation therapy. Delays in treatment put at serious risk those for whom timely therapy is a matter of life and death. In addition to the stress of illness, there is the added stress of anxiety and uncertainty for both sufferers and their families. A system that fails to discern the priority of the importance of human wellbeing ahead of finance is morally deficient.

“The reasons for the strike are complex and not for detailed assessment by a lay-person. They include issues such as levels of training and expertise, comparative rates of remuneration, matters of recruitment and retention of staff, and the adequacy of government funding of health services. They appear to lie beyond the capacity of the parties involved in the pay claims to resolve by themselves.

“The humane and responsible step is for work to resume at once so that patients may immediately have secure access to life-saving therapies. The next priority might be for a third party to make an independent assessment of the situation and to make recommendations. Ultimately it is the responsibility of Government to ensure that essential services are provided to citizens, and government initiatives to this end would seem essential. Professional and systemic morality should put people first, and this sense of ultimate purpose needs to be recovered.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Review: The Magic Flute - Magic Moments

Max Rashbrooke: Mozart’s The Magic Flute is an extraordinary tale, blending a story of great solemnity, of elegant music and Masonic virtue overcoming hatred and discord, with elements of extreme silliness and pure fantasy. .. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: ‘Lovely Swans Of Art’

On Cillia McQueen's 'In a Slant Light': Diary-keeping forms the basis of much of this memoir – as with earlier poems – and we are led gracefully through the waves of her life as she sails through both rough and smooth waters. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news