News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Dame Susan Devoy Urges Embracement of ‘Like Minds'

Dame Susan Devoy Urges Employers to Embrace ‘Like Minds’

Dame Susan Devoy, one of New Zealand’s best known sporting champions, a former chief executive and now chairperson of Sport Bay of Plenty, has become an advocate for employing people with experience of mental illness.

She is currently appearing in a new phase of the Ministry of Health’s Like Minds, Like Mine television campaign, which is challenging friends, whanau, family and employers, to ‘make the difference’ by being more inclusive and less discriminatory towards people with experience of mental illness.

The campaign coincides with new research completed by the Mental Health Foundation for Like Minds, Like Mine, which shows that people with experience of mental illness can and should be actively encouraged to work. The research shows that where employers do not discriminate, the effect of mental illness on a person’s employment is usually minimal.

Dame Susan Devoy formerly employed Aubrey, who also appears in the advertisements, talking about his experience of mental illness with his partner and friends.

She says Aubrey brought many great gifts to his managers and colleagues, including the ability to talk about mental illness, and to learn about tolerance, patience, empathy and support.

“The payback was that Aubrey was part of creating a culture that you could never buy. He challenged us all the time to think about how we could help others and having someone with a mental illness in your workplace teaches you a whole lot of things you don’t learn in any university, or from any books,” Dame Susan says.

Dame Susan’s advice for other employers is to:

  • Make it your business to find out about the condition people have. Ask them what the mental illness means to them.

  • Ask the person what support they need.

  • Normalise as much as possible – people don’t want sympathy.

  • Build policies in your workplace that respect people’s unique differences.

Mental Health Foundation Chief Executive Judi Clements says she hopes Dame Susan will inspire other employers.

“The challenge is for each of us to think about how changing our own behaviour can reduce discrimination and ensure that people with experience of mental illness can lead full and satisfying lives.”

The Mental Health Foundation is willing to work with any employers who need help or advice with having mentally healthy workplaces and policies and employing people with experience of mental illness.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

RLWC 2017 Draw: New Zealand Set For A Festival Of Rugby League

New Zealand Rugby League fans will have the chance to see the Kiwis in action against the best in the Pacific region for the Rugby League World Cup 2017, as announced today at the Official Tournament Draw. More>>

ALSO:

Non-Pokemon News: Magical Park A Safer Augmented Reality For Younger Audiences

Since May, Wellington City Council has been trialling a new app, Magical Park, in collaboration with the game’s New Zealand developer Geo AR Games, in parks around the city. Magical Park uses GPS technology to get users moving around the park to play within a set boundary. More>>

'Erroneous': Pokemon App Makers On Huge Privacy Flaw

We recently discovered that the Pokémon Go account creation process on iOS erroneously requests full access permission for the user's Google account... More>>

ALSO:

Te Wiki O Te Reo: Te Reo Māori Is For All New Zealanders — Minister

Minister for Māori Development Te Ururoa Flavell welcomes the start of Māori Language Week today and invites all New Zealanders to give speaking te reo Māori a go. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news