News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Dame Susan Devoy Urges Embracement of ‘Like Minds'

Dame Susan Devoy Urges Employers to Embrace ‘Like Minds’

Dame Susan Devoy, one of New Zealand’s best known sporting champions, a former chief executive and now chairperson of Sport Bay of Plenty, has become an advocate for employing people with experience of mental illness.

She is currently appearing in a new phase of the Ministry of Health’s Like Minds, Like Mine television campaign, which is challenging friends, whanau, family and employers, to ‘make the difference’ by being more inclusive and less discriminatory towards people with experience of mental illness.

The campaign coincides with new research completed by the Mental Health Foundation for Like Minds, Like Mine, which shows that people with experience of mental illness can and should be actively encouraged to work. The research shows that where employers do not discriminate, the effect of mental illness on a person’s employment is usually minimal.

Dame Susan Devoy formerly employed Aubrey, who also appears in the advertisements, talking about his experience of mental illness with his partner and friends.

She says Aubrey brought many great gifts to his managers and colleagues, including the ability to talk about mental illness, and to learn about tolerance, patience, empathy and support.

“The payback was that Aubrey was part of creating a culture that you could never buy. He challenged us all the time to think about how we could help others and having someone with a mental illness in your workplace teaches you a whole lot of things you don’t learn in any university, or from any books,” Dame Susan says.

Dame Susan’s advice for other employers is to:

  • Make it your business to find out about the condition people have. Ask them what the mental illness means to them.

  • Ask the person what support they need.

  • Normalise as much as possible – people don’t want sympathy.

  • Build policies in your workplace that respect people’s unique differences.

Mental Health Foundation Chief Executive Judi Clements says she hopes Dame Susan will inspire other employers.

“The challenge is for each of us to think about how changing our own behaviour can reduce discrimination and ensure that people with experience of mental illness can lead full and satisfying lives.”

The Mental Health Foundation is willing to work with any employers who need help or advice with having mentally healthy workplaces and policies and employing people with experience of mental illness.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

ASB Classic: Serena Williams Confirmed For 2020

One of the biggest names in sport has confirmed she will be returning to the ASB Classic in 2020. Twenty-three time Grand Slam singles champion Serena Williams will return to Auckland’s ASB Tennis Arena to challenge for the ASB Classic title. More>>

Netball: Taurua To Coach Silver Ferns Through Two More Campaigns

Netball New Zealand has confirmed Taurua will guide the Silver Ferns as they take on the Australian Diamonds in October’s Cadbury Netball Series (Constellation Cup), along with the Northern Quad Series in late January. More>>

ALSO:

Bigger But Less Novel Than The Parrot: Giant Fossil Penguin Find

The discovery of Crossvallia waiparensis, a monster penguin from the Paleocene Epoch (between 66 and 56 million years ago), adds to the list of gigantic, but extinct, New Zealand fauna. These include the world’s largest parrot, a giant eagle, giant burrowing bat, the moa and other giant penguins. More>>

Wellington: Little Blue Penguins Near Station Again

There have been more sightings of penguins near Wellington Railway Station on Sunday night, this time waddling into a parking building above a burger restaurant. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland