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Phoenix: 'Think Before You Drink' Aspartame

Phoenix Organics Says: 'Think Before You Drink' Aspartame

Phoenix Organics has launched a campaign urging people to find out more about aspartame, the controversial artificial sweetener contained in many 'diet' drinks and foods and beverages marketed as containing zero calories.

The company has turned 20,000 bottles of Phoenix Organic Cola into mini-billboards carrying its 'Think Before You Drink' message, and highlighting the concerns that have been raised about aspartame. The bottles will be given away to consumers over the summer.

Company Directors Stefan Lepionka and Marc Ellis said that the Phoenix team had become aware of the controversy that has swirled around aspartame since it was approved for use in beverages in 1983, when they started doing research for a Phoenix Organics brand campaign.

"Having read the Bressler Report of the FDA and other reports on the effects of aspartame, we had the living daylights scared out of all of us," said the Directors.

Internationally the evidence is overwhelming; There are thousands of people who claim that aspartame made them sick.

Our company has created a new section on its website at www.phoenixorganics.co.nz containing links to New Zealand and overseas websites with information on aspartame and the 92 different symptoms noted in over 10,000 complaints received by the US Food & Drug Administration.

"We cannot believe that the NZ government has declared this safe in the face of such evidence."

"Perhaps even scarier is the fact that large multinational companies have persuaded the New Zealand Government that it would be a great thing for our children's health to replace drinks available in schools that contain sugar, with brands containing aspartame.

Phoenix Organics has contacted a number of groups that have been fighting to raise awareness of the health concerns surrounding aspartame and said the company will do whatever it can to support the overall aim to have the Government restrict and ban aspartame.

"I applaud the efforts of the people who have battled indifference and hostility to have their concerns heard," said Stefan Lepionka.

"People like Abby Cormack, who suffered for years before removing aspartame from her diet and completely recovering are banging their heads against official indifference and the power of the advertising dollar.

The Safe Food Campaign and The Soil & Health Association and others have been fighting for years to get action on this issue."

"We are determined to lend our weight to this fight."

Both Stefan and Marc agreed "there would inevitably be accusations levelled that the company was leaping on to the issue of aspartame solely out of commercial interest.

"If anyone takes time to read any of the very credible studies and research that cast doubt on the safety of aspartame, and is then happy to continue drinking and eating products that contain it, then that's an informed choice. We may think they're fools, but that's their right.

Coca Cola has responded to media attention on aspartame by launching a website www.gettherealfacts.co.nz that reflects the official line on this highly controversial artificial sweetener.

"Its interesting that you don't see anything about Coke's multimillion dollar investment in a natural, non-caloric sweetener, called stevia. Coke uses stevia as a sweetener in its diet drinks in Japan and is trying to get approval to use it in the US and elsewhere.

Phoenix Organics is a brand that has always been about using natural ingredients and leaving science in the lab, not bottling it.

"We are committed to ensuring that the public is in an informed position from which to make their own decisions."

Note:

The Bressler Report can be read here: http://www.dorway.com/bressler.txt

It was produced by the US FDA on failures and omissions on GD Searle's trials conducted in support of their application for the approval of aspartame. Before political appointments to the FDA saw the administration approve the drug for beverages in 1983.

ENDS

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