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Mental health campaigns win awards

10 October 2008

Mental health campaigns win awards

Two Ministry of Health campaigns to reduce discrimination and increase support for people with experience of mental illness won gold in last night?s advertising EFFIE awards.

The EFFIE awards are a prestigious set of awards that recognise effectiveness in advertising presented jointly by ANZA (Association of New Zealand Advertisers), TVNZ, and CAANZ (Communication Agencies Association of New Zealand).

The Lowdown (www.thelowdown.co.nz) won gold in the social marketing/public service category. The Lowdown is an interactive website for young people, providing information and online support for depression.

Eleven years of challenging the stigma and discrimination associated with mental illness was also acknowledged as the Like Minds, Like Mine campaign was awarded the Grand EFFIE for sustained success.

Mark Sainsbury, who handed out the award, acknowledged the contribution the Like Minds campaign has made to change the way New Zealanders think and act about mental illness. The award also acknowledged how the programme had developed and worked closely with the National Depression Initiative to increase not just positive attitudes but also to try to create a more supportive society.

Together these programmes are changing the way New Zealanders understand mental illness. People now know more about common mental illnesses, are more willing and able to ask for help, and more aware that they can make a difference.

Darryl Bishop, the Ministry of Health's Like Minds, Like Mine programme leader says, ?We already know from ongoing evaluation that these campaigns have been successful, and I am thrilled that this success has been recognised. With about half of New Zealanders experiencing mental illness at some time in their lives it is very important we get this right.?

Darryl also acknowledged the contribution of both the famous and everyday New Zealanders who have played their part in these campaigns. ?It is a tribute to all of those people who have given their time and stories so generously so that we can take such positive messages of recovery, social inclusion and support to the nation.?

Like Minds, the National Depression Initiative and the Lowdown have all featured real people sharing their experiences of mental illness.

Darryl added ?Congratulations must go to DraftFCB, the advertising agency behind the campaigns. However, we must also acknowledge the many people around New Zealand working with their local communities to put the messages from the ads into action.?

The successful media campaigns are backed up by community activities and events, training, research, telephone and web-based support services and information, newsletters and resources.

More information: www.thelowdown.co.nz www.likeminds.org.nz www.depression.org.nz

ENDS


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