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How to flourish in the festive season

For many people, Christmas and New Year is a time for giving, relaxing and spending time with loved ones but for others it can be a time of loneliness and financial stress.

During this time, the Mental Health Foundation is urging everyone to, not only be mindful and empathetic to what others may be going through, but to also take steps to look after their own personal wellbeing.

“When people take an active role in supporting their own wellbeing, they can’t help but flourish”, says Judi Clements, Chief Executive of the Mental Health Foundation. ‘Activities that support your wellbeing include connecting with others, giving, in its many forms including giving of your time, taking notice of the world around you, learning new things and being active.”

The Mental Health Foundation’s vision for 2011 and beyond is to create a society where all people flourish. A flourishing individual is someone, who for the most part, experiences positive emotions, positive interest and engagement with world around them, and has meaning and purpose in their lives. And, evidence suggests that people who are flourishing are less at risk of physical and mental health problems and have better social relationships.

Some tips on how to flourish over the festive season include –
• Focus on positive emotions
• Do not neglect yourself. Try to schedule in some time each day, even if it is just 10 minutes and do something that revitalizes you both physically and mentally. Taking a walk, reading a book or meditation are just some things you could do
• Know that it is OK to say no. You do not need to be everything to everyone all the time
• Remember and practice the five winning ways to wellbeing – connect, give, take notice, learn and be active
• Appreciate what you already have
• Relax and enjoy yourself

“With the fast pace of life nowadays, it is easy to get overwhelmed and stressed out” explains Ms Clements. “It is important to remember that if you are feeling down, it is OK to ask for help. Don’t keep it to yourself, talk to friends, family, or make use of helplines such as Lifeline or Youthline.”

ADITIONAL INFORMATION

Flourishing is a measure of mental health that has been developed within the last decade and can be used to determine the level of positive mental health in populations. It is about focusing on the good things in life. It’s about the things we aspire to, both as individuals and as members of a wider community.

Lifeline on 0800 543 354
Youthline on 0800 376 633

ENDS

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