News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Not just fatty junk food that lowers IQ

Not just fatty junk food that lowers IQ

To protect your child’s intelligence, keep them away from fluoride as well as fatty processed foods. British research just published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health shows lowering of IQ from exposure to processed foods at a young age. But over 20 separate studies in the last 10 years link fluoride exposure to lowered IQ also.

Fluoride was classed as “an emerging neurotoxin” in the medical journal Lancet in 2007, the same year a scientific consensus statement was issued regarding fluoride’s toxicity to the developing brain.[1]

“Most importantly, do not make up baby formula with fluoridated water, and do not give young children fluoridated toothpaste – especially adult strength fluoridated toothpaste. But if you do, make sure they rinse it all out,” advises Mark Atkin of health group Fluoride Action Network NZ.

The US Government and American Dental Association recommended in 2006 against using water with 0.7 ppm or more fluoride when making up baby formula. New Zealand Ministry of Health recommends 0.7 to 1 ppm fluoride in drinking water, making it unsuitable for babies. It refuses to recognise the US warning. Yet the same risk was identified by Food Standards Australia NZ in 1997.

Both the Ministry and the NZ Dental Association also recommend parents give their children adult strength, not child strength, fluoride toothpaste, against manufacturers’ recommendations, and NOT rinse out the surplus.

“This is gross negligence,” say Mr Atkin, a qualified lawyer. “Adult strength toothpaste has 1000 ppm fluoride. Swallowing even a small amount, by not rinsing out surplus, causes spike levels of fluoride in the blood equal to those shown to cause neurological damage in laboratory rats. The Ministry has a statutory duty to protect health. Its recommendations regarding fluoride breach that duty. It is completely out of step with the international community on fluoridation.”

“Total exposure to fluoride today is at least six times that recorded in the 1940s, when water fluoridation was first promoted, in the belief it would help reduce tooth decay,” advises Mr Atkin. It is in water, toothpaste, pesticide residues, on fruit, in fruit juice (without warning), and in many drugs, such as Prozac.

“We need to limit our exposure to fluoride, to protect our health. This is most important for young children when the rapidly growing brain is most susceptible to toxic damage” concludes Mr Atkin.

Mark Atkin

[1] Scientific Consensus Statement on Neurodevelopmental Disorders 2007

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Gold For RNZ: Muslim Post-9/11 Series, Kim Hill Win In New York

The Radio New Zealand podcast series Public Enemy has won a gold award for excellence for its presenter, Mohamed Hassan, at the prestigious New York Festival Radio Awards announced in Manhattan today. RNZ National’s Saturday Morning host, Kim Hill, also received a gold award for Best Radio Personality. More>>

Human Rights Commission: Give Nothing To Racism

A campaign urging New Zealanders to give nothing to racism and refuse to spread intolerance has been launched by some of the country’s most well-known people. More>>

Louis Vuitton Series Win: Emirates Team NZ Will Challenge For The America’s Cup

By beating Artemis 5-2 they now take on Oracle Team USA in the America’s Cup match starting next weekend. More>>

ALSO:

Monterey: Rodger Fox Big Band Invited To Celebrated Festival

The Rodger Fox Big Band has received an invitation to perform at the 2017 Monterey 60th Anniversary Jazz Festival in the USA in September of this year. More>>

AntARTica: Scientist’s Painting Discovered In Antarctic Hut

The New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust has discovered an almost perfectly preserved 118 year old watercolour painting among penguin-excrement, dust and mould covered papers found in an historic hut at Cape Adare, Antarctica. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Set In Stone

Tthere are over a thousand public war memorials scattered around the country, commemorating over 30,000 New Zealanders who have died in wartime, and most of whom are buried overseas. More>>>More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland