News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Christchurch trust wins major Maori Public Health award

Christchurch trust wins major Maori Public Health award

Christchurch’s Te Puawaitanga ki Otautahi Trust is this year’s winner of the Public Health Association’s Tu Rangatira Mo Te Ora award.

The award recognises outstanding achievement in Maori public health, and this year set out to recognise a person, group or organisation, iwi/hapu, or marae who has shown leadership in supporting the hauora of the people of Canterbury following the 2010-2011 earthquakes.

“We have all been affected by the Canterbury earthquakes in some way, and when it comes to public health the earthquakes are one of the most significant challenges we have faced this century,” Public Health Association spokesperson Peter Thomas said today.

“Our experiences with our extended whanau and marae living mean that Maori health providers are innately equipped to deal with civil emergencies like these earthquakes.

“We were impressed with the range of services that Te Puawaitanga ki Otautahi has delivered during this emergency, and the ongoing support the Trust offers whanau in Christchurch.

“On behalf of the NZ Public Health Association I would like to congratulate Te Puawaitanga ki Otautahi for their outstanding efforts.”

The Kaiwhakahaere of Te Puawaitanga ki Otautahi Trust Suzi Clarke says the organisation is very excited about the award and the public recognition of their work.

Te Puawaitanga ki Otautahi Trust emerged as an organisation out of the Otautahi Branch of the Maori Women’s Welfare League (MWWL) in 2004. The Trust is a kaupapa Maori provider who employs over 30 staff and offers a range of community-based Whanau Ora support services including:

·Tamariki Ora/Well-Child services;

·Outreach Immunisation;

·Parents As First Teachers;

·Rapuora Mobile DSM Nursing service;

·Canterbury Breastfeeding Advocacy, Support Groups and Mama 2 Mama peer training;

·A range of nutrition and physical activity classes;

·Support and development for a Maori community garden.

“Six months on from the Christchurch quake and only now are we able to stand back and reflect on the impact the quake has had on our communities,” Suzi said.

“After the first earthquake we realised many Maori whanau, who are under resourced or on limited incomes, were not in a position to prepare for an emergency. So we set about working with whanau to develop an emergency plan. The plan identified where whanau will gather when an emergency strikes and what type of supplies they needed to have in storage.”

In partnership with the Maori Women’s Welfare League (MWWL) the Trust developed an Emergency Survival Kit, which is distributed to vulnerable kaumatua and whanau.

“Initially a number of whanau took fright and fled the city and we spent significant time locating them to ensure their safety. However many have now returned and need our support more than ever.

“Whanau who remained in Christchurch were able to put on a brave face at first. However we found they became worn down from the ongoing significant after-shocks, loss of power, water and sewage. With support they have found the strength to continue.

“We received funding directly from Ngai Tahu and other iwi throughout Aotearoa to provide basic necessities like blankets, bedding, thermals and water cans.

“We have a large enrolled population of five thousand, and following the emergency we worked with approximately a thousand clients who required additional support as a direct result of the quakes.”

Aroha Reriti-Crofts from MWWL said that Te Puawaitanga ki Otautahi moved very quickly into action following the earthquakes.

“Their first priority was to look after the whanau of the staff, then they were able to move out into the community.

“They have distributed donations from League (MWWL) branches around the country. When you go into whanau you reach many people. We have teams with boot loads of resources to distribute. We go to the homes of our whanau and if they are not there, we leave a note in their letter box.

“Te Puawaitanga ki Otautahi got out there and moved very quickly. When you build the whanau, you build the city.”

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news