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New approach to care for mental health unit

Media release

9 February 2012

New approach to care for mental health unit

A method of care that reduces the need for restraint and seclusion for mental health clients is being introduced to Greymouth Hospital’s Manaakitanga Acute Admissions Unit.

Sensory modulation is a way for clients to manage, and reduce, their level of anxiety and distress by stimulating the senses using a combination of techniques and equipment, in a way that promotes soothing and refocusing. The approach may include the use of warmth, and weight blankets, massage, music or exercise

Part of the approach is setting up a quiet room where, in a peaceful environment, clients can use whatever calming equipment or technique they find works best for them.

Anne Tacon, West Coast DHB associate director nursing, mental health, says Manaakitanga staff are currently training in the techniques in collaboration with staff from the Nelson Marlborough DHB and Hillmorton Hospital in Christchurch, and it is hoped to have the quiet room set up early this year. Training is also supported by Te Pou o Te Whakaaro Nui, an organisation that offers support and development for mental health, addiction and disability workers.

The use of sensory modulation techniques in New Zealand is being led by occupational therapists, who have taken a lead role in training nationwide. Once trained, staff will work with a client to establish which of the techniques they find most helpful.

“The aim is for the client to learn to manage their own anxiety and distress by using sensory modulation techniques. These techniques will assist the person to effectively self-manage distress on their return home.

“This is an exciting initiative and welcomed by nursing staff who are committed to reducing the need for restraint in the mental health setting,” she said.

The West Coast DHB’s chief executive David Meates says introducing the new techniques will be a real advance for both clients and staff. “DHB staff have been working very hard to improve both in-patient and outreach mental health services for clients on the Coast .

“This is also further evidence of the eagerness of the DHB and its staff to work collaboratively with other DHB’s that can offer expertise and support.”


Ends

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