News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Grass might be greener, but dreams are sometimes hard

Grass might be greener, but dreams are sometimes hard to achieve


MEDIA RELEASE
25 October 2012

This week, our Dragon Baby story is about a man who came to New Zealand to provide a better, greener environment for his family, and a better education system for his son.

But the dream wasn’t that easy to achieve – Asian migrant David shares his experience
of managing and negotiating a healthy transition for his son from one culture to another.

Many Asian parents will relate to the difficulties he has faced: adjusting to a more holistic approach to education, encouraging potential over competition, becoming a positive role model, learning to adjust to Kiwi ways and more.

David’s story is the fourth in a series posted on the Mental Health Foundation’s English-Mandarin Kai Xin Xing Dong website that are intended to support and encourage new parents.
We are posting one story a week about the challenges Chinese parents face bringing up their newborn “dragon babies” in New Zealand society.

We understand that new parents need help and support and, sometimes, knowing where to find these can be all you need to feel more confident. We hope by reading these parents' stories you will not feel so alone.

The stories also give lots of practical advice for the first years of a child’s life and beyond. They touch on post natal depression and where to get help.

The series coincides with the launch of the Chinese Mental Health Consultation Services’ new Vagus helpline.

All stories are published online in English and Mandarin.


Vagus Line 0800 56 76 666

This new service is to promote family harmony among Chinese, enhance parenting skills, decrease conflict among family members (couple, parent-child, in-laws) and stop family violence.

It provides free, confidential and professional advice, such as parenting strategies and communication skills. If necessary, clients can be referred to Vagus counselling services or related resources.

Service hours: Monday, Wednesday, Friday from
12 noon to 2pm

Year of the Dragon

2012 is the Chinese Year of the Dragon and has given rise to the phrase "dragon baby" for families expecting a new arrival.

The dragon is the mightiest zodiac sign in Chinese astrology, and is associated with traits such as success, ambition and independence. Many mothers consider this to be a particularly auspicious year to give birth.

In recognition of this, we have made a special Dragon Baby section on the Kai Xin Xing Dong website, where we offer Chinese language information for new and expectant mothers.
Kai Xin Xing Dong

Kai Xin Xing Dong is a Like Minds, Like Mine public education programme aimed at reducing the stigma and discrimination faced by Chinese people who experience mental illness. The project is funded by the Ministry of Health and guided by the Kai Xin Xing Dong Advisory Group.

David’s story - http://www.mentalhealth.org.nz/kaixinxingdong/page/493-resources+dragon-babies+parents-stories+david


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

August 4: Centenary Of New Zealand Entering The First World War

PM John Key: I move, that this House recognise that on the 4th of August 2014, we will mark the centenary of New Zealand entering the First World War... More>>

ALSO:

Cyclists Net First NZ Gold

New Zealand won a gold meal and two bronzes on the first day of the Commonwealth Games. There was joy and heartbreak in an incredibly full day of sport. Here's how the New Zealanders fared. More>>

Cap Bocage: Anti-Mining Campaign Doco Debuts At NZ Film Festival

Playing at this year’s New Zealand International Film Festival, Cap Bocage is a close-up exploration of the forces that came into play when environmental issues and indigenous rights became intertwined in New Caledonia ... More>>

Film Fest:

More Film:

Sharon Ellis Review: A View From The Bridge

Arthur Miller’s A View From the Bridge is Circa’s latest big production, it opened on Saturday 19 July and it is a stunning triumph. More>>

Māori Language Week: He Karanga Kia Kaha Ake Te Tīhau Ki Te Reo Māori

The Māori Language Commission wishes to see social media swamped with Māori language tweets and messages for Te Wiki o te Reo Māori using the hashtag #tekupu. More>>

ALSO:

Book Vote: Kiwis Prefer Young Adult & Classics

To compile their Top 100 List for 2014, Whitcoulls again asked New Zealanders to vote for their favourite books and authors. And while classic novels continue to appeal to Kiwi readers, 2014 marks a significant new trend – the increasing popularity of novels for young adults. More>>

ALSO:

Five NZ Cities: Bill Bailey Back To The Southern Hemisphere

The gap between how we imagine our lives to be and how they really are is the subject of Bill’s new show Limboland. With his trademark intelligence and sharp wit, he tells tales of finding himself in this halfway place. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Book Television Is Coming

Carole Beu of The Women’s Bookshop in Auckland, Graham Beattie of The Book Blog and producer Deb Faith of FaceTV have raised enough money via crowd funding at Boosted – just under $7,000 so far – for 12 episodes, which begin production in September, and will be on screen later that month. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news