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Out with the fish oil supplements, in with the food…


MEDIA RELEASE
05 November 2012

Out with the fish oil supplements, in with the food…

KIMMITHGONE – Hemp Seed Oil

This month Kim Renshaw launches Kimmithgone Hemp Seed Oil, a true super-food that could help save the ocean’s depleted fish stocks. At the Taste NZ festival 15th – 18th November in Auckland and continuing around the North Island over the summer, Kim and Naturopath Toni Vallance share commonsense nutritional advice and explain why Hemp Seed Oil and other functional foods are so much better for you than ultra-refined oils, like vegetable oils and fish oil supplements.

“You can change your health by just using food,” says Miss Renshaw. “By bringing nutrient-dense functional foods, that are fresh and local into your diet, you decrease the need for things like unsustainable fish oil. Like any nutrient, it is better utilised by the body when kept in it's natural state. Unfortunately some commercially produced fish oils on the market are highly refined and studies show they are harder for the body to digest and utilize than real food."

“Fish oil is responsible for more than 10% of the global catch. Commercial fishing and decreasing fish stocks are becoming more of an issue - we need to look at other options for omega 3s.”
Hemp Seed Oil is also unique in its combination of omegas. “It’s the most polyunsaturated oil and it has omega 3 and 6 in the perfect ratio for the human body. It’s cold-pressed which is really important - other refined vegetable oils use heat and chemicals which damage the nutrients and antioxidants, and this is what we want to take it for!” she said.

Hemp Seed Oil also contains omega 9, vitamin E and GLA (the active ingredient in Evening Primrose Oil). “GLA is important for hormone function in the body, can help with premenstrual tension symptoms such as swollen breasts, mood swings, as well as skin conditions such as acne. It’s a fantastic fatty acid for women in particular,” said Miss Vallance.

The Hemp is grown in the South Island of New Zealand without the use of chemicals. Miss Renshaw said “it takes only 120 days from sowing to harvest time, which is the second fastest growing crop on the planet after bamboo.” Hemp also requires very little water to grow, making it an alternative for water and pesticide hungry cotton crops.

The Taste NZ show is Auckland’s premier food expo. With more than 140 exhibitors and 11 top Auckland restaurants including Euro and Clooney, as well as master-classes from The Grove’s Ben Bailey and Nutritionist Nadia Lim this is one fantastic event.

For more information visit http://kimmithgone.com/

[END]

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