News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Ninety percent success rate for smoking cessation services


Ninety percent success rate for smoking cessation services


In a small office at the Otago Asthma Society, two part-time staff, Jo Torrance and Lynda Paris, have a record they are proud of – 90 percent of all clients who come to see them to stop smoking don’t start again.

“The majority of our clients have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) so the motivation for them to stop smoking is relatively high. The alternative is a very poor quality of life. Giving up is still very difficult for many of them as they have been smoking a long time,” said Jo.

In New Zealand an estimated 1 in 7 people aged 45 and over has COPD (more than 200,000 people) with 85 percent of these smokers or ex-smokers. World COPD Day is on 14 November. The Asthma Foundation is encouraging all smokers or ex-smokers who have breathing difficulties to talk to their GP or contact their nearest asthma society for information and support. The message is ‘It’s not too late to stop smoking’ to make a change for better health.

Many of the clients who come to the Otago Asthma Society self refer as they want to make the change for better health. They often don’t have the skills in accessing smoking cessation services or know about getting the right help. “Many doctors aren’t free and there can be a part cost in accessing the smoking cessation nurse. We see them free of charge, they just need to have a respiratory condition and to want to stop,” said Jo.

The team puts their success down to the very intensive, one-on-one support that is provided. “We see clients very regularly the first little while – this can be every couple of days to start with – to keep their motivation high while they are going through this period,” said Jo.

Jo and Lynda also continually follow-up clients. “We’re still supporting some clients 18 months on. It’s important to keep in touch as old habits die very slowly. Addictive personalities need to be reinforced they are doing well, which can be just be a phone call,” they said.

For us it is all about quality. They have no contract to provide this service in the community, it is self funded by the Otago Asthma Society. The benefit of this is they don’t have to justify seeing clients in a commercial sense. Their focus is on the personal relationship that is built with clients, which takes time.

The service initially started with a grant from the Asthma Foundation for a pilot programme. The Society now sees it as a valuable asset in the services they provide and fund, especially alongside their COPD work.

“As far as we are concerned we can throw all other services out the window while people are still smoking – so this is an important focus for us,” said Jo.

“There is a huge amount of reward that comes out of this. We see the benefits our clients who stop smoking gain including better health and a better quality of life. That’s why we do this – it’s not just a numbers game,” said Jo.

-End-

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news