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Countdown Kids Hospital Appeal gives to Chch Hospital

December 7, 2012

Countdown Kids Hospital Appeal presents Christchurch Hospital with early Christmas gift

Christchurch Hospital’s Child Health Division will receive a welcome donation next Friday (December 14, 2012) from the Countdown Kids Hospital Appeal thanks to hundreds of contributions from customers.

Media are invited to attend the cheque presentation at 11am at Countdown Hornby, Christchurch.

Countdown Kids Hospital Appeal Chairperson, Ruth Krippner says across the country, this year’s Countdown Kids Hospital Appeal raised more than $1.2 million – the most ever raised since the programme launched in 2007.

“We are absolutely thrilled to be able to help Christchurch Hospital and make all the difference to sick children and their recovery,” Ruth says.

Hundreds of fundraising events, organised by Countdown team members, suppliers and district health boards, were held over three months between August and October.

“It’s fantastic to see Countdown team members and the community get behind the Appeal, and work so hard to raise these much-needed funds. This year we saw a whole new ball game of fundraising, including a Winter Wonderland Ball, 24-hour relay race, golf and soccer tournaments and a nationwide raffle,” Ruth says.

“We know from the hospitals that this donation will make a difference to children in their care and it’s great to be able to play our part.”

Ceremonies are being held across the country this month to present the other participating hospitals with cheques from the Appeal funds.

Countdown Kids Hospital Appeal
• The Countdown Kids Hospital Appeal 2012 started in August and ran for 12 weeks
• It was previously known as the Fresh Future Children’s Hospital Appeal, and has now raised more than $5.7 million since it started in 2007
• All funds raised go towards 10 dedicated children’s hospitals and wards around New Zealand including Whangarei, Waikato, Bay of Plenty, Hawke’s Bay, Wellington, Greymouth, Christchurch, Otago, Invercargill, and Auckland.
• Each year the Appeal donates a one-off payment to two smaller hospital units. This year Rotorua and Whanagaui received donations.


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