News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Two Buildings Coming Down at Waikato Hospital

Media Release

Date: 24 January 2013

TWO BUILDINGS COMING DOWN AT WAIKATO HOSPITAL


Another project in the $500 million Waikato DHB rebuilding programme involves a major demolition job taking down two buildings on the Waiora Waikato Hospital campus in Hamilton.

Demolition of the seven-floor Smith Building and an adjacent two-storey building, originally wards 4 and 5, starts next week at a cost of $2 million. A blessing will take place in the Smith Building at 7.30am tomorrow (Friday 25 January).
Smith is a long, narrow building, which has a lift shaft at the end butting up to the Meade Clinical Centre. That needs to go to complete stages two and three of the centre.

Both buildings needed substantial seismic upgrades because of new building code requirements.
Wards 4 and 5, known initially as the Douglas and Rothwell wards, opened in 1927 and accommodated surgical patients.

Smith Building was completed in June 1964 and named after the late George Smith of Huntly who was chairman of the Waikato Hospital Board from 1953 to 1959 and a member from December 1927. During planning and building, staff referred to as the north-south block.

The 196-bed block was the first major step towards reorganising the hospital’s scattered wards. It helped relieve chronic overcrowding issues and allowed the distribution of patients in a less ad hoc fashion.

Initially the Smith Building housed most of the hospital’s surgical, orthopaedic and paediatric surgical patients. The building had one ward on each level but all were converted to medical wards after surgical patients were relocated to the new Menzies Block in 1974. Smith 5 and 6 were initially paediatric wards and then medical wards from 1984.

Hospital historians claim it resulted in only moderate improvements in the co-ordination of the hospital’s wards.

In recent times it has had Echocardiology, Endoscopy and Medical Day Care on level 1 and Wards 24-26 on levels 4-6.

Demolition starts next week and will be completed by June.

Chief operating officer Jan Adams said she was amazed at how patients, visitors and staff put up with the ongoing disruption at the Waiora Waikato Hospital campus.

“Smith Building has been the medical block for 48 years and holds many memories for our staff, patients and their families.

“The journey to this point has involved huge amounts of work for a small group of people and I take this opportunity to note my thanks and sincere appreciation for their hard work, focus and commitment to delivering this project on budget and on time. “

She heaped praise on three in particular – project managers Ros Morell and Kevin Bardsley and Graham Dudfield from Property and Infrastructure and to the charge nurse managers.

“Tomorrow marks the end of an era of Smith Building as a place of care. Thank you all for the part you played, whether small or large, in helping us get to this point. Like many of you, I'm looking forward to a slightly less chaotic campus over the next 12 months with the openings of the new Older Persons and Rehabilitation Building and stages two and three of the Meade Clinical Centre,” said Mrs Adams.

Read more about the history and a thanks to staff from Jan Adams.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Werewolf: Katniss Joins The News Team

From the outset, the Hunger Games series has dwelt obsessively on the ways that media images infiltrate our public and personal lives... From that grim starting point, Mockingjay Part One takes the process a few stages further. There is very little of the film that does not involve the characters (a) being on screens (b) making propaganda footage to be screened and (c) reacting to what other characters have been doing on screens. More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf: Rescuing Paul Robeson

Would it be any harder these days, for the US government to destroy the career of a famous American entertainer and disappear them from history – purely because of their political beliefs? You would hope so. In 1940, Paul Robeson – a gifted black athlete, singer, film star, Shakespearean actor and orator – was one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. More>>

ALSO:

"Not A Competition... A Quest": Chapman Tripp Theatre Award Winners

Big winners on the night were Equivocation (Promising Newcomer, Best Costume, Best Director and Production of the Year), Kiss the Fish (Best Music Composition, Outstanding New NZ Play and Best Supporting Actress), and Watch (Best Set, Best Sound Design and Outstanding Performance). More>>

ALSO:

Film Awards: The Dark Horse Scores Big

An inspirational film based on real life Gisborne speed-chess coach An inspirational film based on real life Gisborne speed-chess coach Genesis Potini, made all the right moves to take out top honours along with five other awards at the Rialto Channel New Zealand Film Awards - nicknamed The Moas. More>>

ALSO:

Theatre: Ralph McCubbin Howell Wins 2014 Bruce Mason Award

The Bruce Mason Playwriting Award was presented to Ralph McCubbin Howell at the Playmarket Accolades in Wellington on 23 November 2014. More>>

ALSO:

One Good Tern: Fairy Tern Crowned NZ Seabird Of The Year

The fairy tern and the Fiji petrel traded the lead in the poll several times. But a late surge saw it come out on top with 1882 votes. The Fiji petrel won 1801 votes, and 563 people voted for the little blue penguin. More>>

Music Awards: Lorde Reigns Supreme

Following a hugely successful year locally and internationally, Lorde has done it again taking out no less than six Tuis at the 49th annual Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news