News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Discussion Needed on Controversial Mental Health Treatments

Changing Minds reveals confusion and lack of knowledge are rife when it comes to some of the current treatments for mental health issues.

The Changing Minds Film Festival, held late last year, concluded with a panel discussion about current issues within social change movements in relation to film-making, particularly in the mental health sector. The discussion inevitably touched on some controversial topics, including electro-convulsive therapy (ECT), seclusion, and informed consent.

A video of the panel discussion, released earlier today, demonstrates some of the polarised views that have emerged in the use of such treatments. One audience member stated: “I wish to know about the practice of electric shock treatment. Is that still permitted? I think that it shouldn’t be, and what is being done about it?” A discussion on the pros and cons of this particular “treatment” and the paradigm in which it exists continued from here.

‘Mental Notes’ a film by Jim Marbrook released last year, alerted many to the human rights atrocities of past psychiatric interventions in New Zealand’s history. One panel member in the video relays her experience of watching the film: “…what was so devastating about Jim’s film was listening to stories of people being restrained and then punished for trying to voice what they were feeling."

Changing Minds advocate for a movement beyond the current technical paradigm to explain “mental illness” to examine social, environmental, physical, and other causal effects on mental health-related problems. This relates also to the types of treatments available to people. There is a push from many mental health service-users toward a stronger focus on social support and care opportunities for those experiencing mental health issues, rather than purely pharmacological interventions.

Changing Minds hopes to hold opportunities for public discussion on some of the issues raised in the video later this year.

The panel discussion videos can be viewed here.

Ends.

Changing Minds is an Auckland-based not-for-profit organisation that recognises and values the diversity of human experience and strives to work innovatively to encourage positive social change, particularly in the areas of mental health and addictions.

Website: http://changingminds.org.nz/

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Werewolf: Music Criticism As A Dating Metaphor

Music criticism can be just another form of consumer advic... Yet ever since pop music criticism first entered the media mainstream it has played a wider role, too. Rather than a decree with a numerical score attached, this kind of criticism functions more like travel notes. A conversation, even a form of seduction. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news