News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Discussion Needed on Controversial Mental Health Treatments

Changing Minds reveals confusion and lack of knowledge are rife when it comes to some of the current treatments for mental health issues.

The Changing Minds Film Festival, held late last year, concluded with a panel discussion about current issues within social change movements in relation to film-making, particularly in the mental health sector. The discussion inevitably touched on some controversial topics, including electro-convulsive therapy (ECT), seclusion, and informed consent.

A video of the panel discussion, released earlier today, demonstrates some of the polarised views that have emerged in the use of such treatments. One audience member stated: “I wish to know about the practice of electric shock treatment. Is that still permitted? I think that it shouldn’t be, and what is being done about it?” A discussion on the pros and cons of this particular “treatment” and the paradigm in which it exists continued from here.

‘Mental Notes’ a film by Jim Marbrook released last year, alerted many to the human rights atrocities of past psychiatric interventions in New Zealand’s history. One panel member in the video relays her experience of watching the film: “…what was so devastating about Jim’s film was listening to stories of people being restrained and then punished for trying to voice what they were feeling."

Changing Minds advocate for a movement beyond the current technical paradigm to explain “mental illness” to examine social, environmental, physical, and other causal effects on mental health-related problems. This relates also to the types of treatments available to people. There is a push from many mental health service-users toward a stronger focus on social support and care opportunities for those experiencing mental health issues, rather than purely pharmacological interventions.

Changing Minds hopes to hold opportunities for public discussion on some of the issues raised in the video later this year.

The panel discussion videos can be viewed here.

Ends.

Changing Minds is an Auckland-based not-for-profit organisation that recognises and values the diversity of human experience and strives to work innovatively to encourage positive social change, particularly in the areas of mental health and addictions.

Website: http://changingminds.org.nz/

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news