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Campaign aims to take Canterbury beyond All Right


Healthy Christchurch – All Right

February 25, 2013

World first campaign aims to take Canterbury beyond All Right

A world first social marketing campaign designed to help us think about our mental health and wellbeing is hitting the streets of Canterbury this week.

The ‘All Right’ campaign is a Healthy Christchurch project led by the Mental Health Foundation and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB).

Sue Turner, Healthy Christchurch manager, says there is a strong need for the campaign.


“Canterbury has changed a lot and we all see things a little differently. All Right is about helping people realise that they’re not alone, encouraging them to connect with others, and supporting them to boost their wellbeing,” Ms Turner says.

“Over the next three years the campaign will continue to evolve to meet the changing needs of our community.”

Ms Turner says the campaign has been informed by extensive research, including interviews with community leaders, focus groups, and a phone survey of 800 people in Christchurch, Waimakariri and Selwyn.

“Our research showed that there are large chunks of our population who are struggling and who would benefit from tools and support to improve their wellbeing.

“The stress and anxiety caused by dealing with insurance, repairs, and the agencies involved in the recovery has resulted in a ‘double blow’ which for many has proved more debilitating than the earthquakes.

Sue says the research also showed there’s a sense people have been forgotten in the recovery and buildings are more important than people.

“All Right is about ensuring wellbeing is at the heart of our recovery,” Sue says.

“Overall the research paints a very complex picture of where people are with their wellbeing. On the one hand people are struggling with specifics – things like dealing with insurers and repairs. On the other there's a new found sense of hope and optimism for the future.”

Sue Turner says the campaign is a world first.

“This is the first time a social marketing campaign focusing on mental health and wellbeing has been used following a major disaster. We anticipate that what we’ve learned so far in the development of the campaign, and what we will continue to discover, will be of great benefit to future recovery efforts around the world.”


There are three phases to the campaign. The first phase started this week and includes street posters, bus shelters and newspaper advertising. Phase two begins in late March and encourages people to stop and consider their wellbeing and that of others, and to take small steps to address it. Phase three provides opportunities and resources for communities in Canterbury to make the campaign their own.

ends

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