News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Nurses consulting on prescribing rights

Media release 28 February 2013

Nurses consulting on prescribing rights

Proposals to allow appropriately qualified registered nurses to prescribe are designed to make it easier for patients to obtain the medicines they need.

The proposals, which build on the success of a diabetes nurse prescribing project in 2011, would allow more registered nurses to prescribe in certain situations and the Nursing Council is seeking feedback on the proposals.

Nursing Council chief executive Carolyn Reed says the health system is straining to meet the needs of people in rural locations, some vulnerable groups and the increasing numbers of people with lifestyle and chronic diseases. She says nurses could make a real contribution towards meeting these needs.

“We have seen studies over the years recommend more nurse-led clinics as a means of meeting needs, particularly where there is a shortage of doctors. Nurses already have a significant role in health promotion, disease prevention and in the assessment and treatment of minor ailments and illnesses. Enabling nurses to prescribe would enhance the services they can deliver,” Ms Reed says.

“The diabetes nurse prescribing project found that doctors welcomed the expanded role of nurses. Having nurses look after routine prescription needs and patient management left doctors able to focus on more complex and acute cases and needs. Patients also were happy.

“Nurse prescribing is a significant and historic advance in the evolution of nursing practice but more significantly it is about delivering benefits to all New Zealanders in terms of improving access to timely and convenient health services and medicines,” Ms Reed says.

In developing its proposals the Council worked closely with the Ministry of Health and consulted widely across the nursing and health sector. As a result of that preliminary round of consultation, the Council is now seeking comment on the introduction of two levels of nurse prescribing. The first - community nurse prescribing - would enable nurses in community and outpatient settings, who have completed a course in community nurse prescribing, to prescribe a limited number of medicines for minor ailments and illnesses.

The second - specialist nurse prescribing, would enable nurses with a post-graduate diploma in specialist nurse prescribing who work in a collaborative multi-disciplinary team in specialty services or in general practice, to prescribe for common conditions such as diabetes, asthma and hypertension.

The Council’s consultation document outlines in details the qualifications, standards and competencies nurses would require. It also seeks views on the medicines nurses should be able to prescribe.

Ms Reed says nurses are the largest part of the health workforce and it makes sense to utilise their skills and knowledge to improve access to health care services and medicines.


Non medical prescribing has increased over the past 15 years. Dentists, optometrists, midwives and nurse practitioners (higher level nurses with Masters Degrees) all have prescribing rights. Pharmacists and dieticians, along with registered nurses, are also applying to become designated prescribers under the Medicines Act.


The consultation document and questionnaire can be found at:

http://www.nursingcouncil.org.nz/index.cfm/1,283,html/Consultation-on-registered-nurse-prescribing

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

A Series Of Tubes: 150 Years Of The Cook Strait Cable

“It was a momentous achievement for its time. The successful connection came on the third attempt at laying the cable, and followed a near disaster when the first cable snapped - almost destroying the ship Weymouth in the process,” says Ms Adams. More>>

ALSO:

February 2017: Guns N' Roses - New Zealand Dates Announced

Founder Axl Rose and former members, Slash and Duff McKagan have regrouped for one of the century’s most anticipated tours... Rolling Stone said: "This was the real thing, the thing we'd all been waiting for: the triumphant return of one of the most important bands to cross rock music history. And it happened in our lifetime.” More>>

Werewolf: Brando, Peckinpah And Billy The Kid

Gordon Campbell: Initially, One-Eyed Jacks was supposed to have been directed by Stanley Kubrick from a script by Sam Peckinpah – yet it quickly became Brando’s baby... More>>

Book Awards: ANZAC Heroes Wins Margaret Mahy Book Of The Year

“Simply stunning, with gold-standard production values,” say the judges of the winner of this year’s Margaret Mahy Book of the Year Award in the prestigious New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults. ANZAC Heroes is also the winner of the Elsie Locke Award for the Best Book in the Non-Fiction category. More>>

Baby Animals: Hamilton Zoo Rhino Calf Named

Hamilton Zoo’s latest rhino calf has been named Samburu and he's being celebrated with a unique zoo experience... Samburu arrived after his mother Kito’s 16-month pregnancy and the calf brings the number of white rhinos at Hamilton Zoo to six. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Rio Olympics

Were you pretty excited earlier this week when Vietnam won its first ever Olympic gold medal? Hanoi, reportedly, went wild... Perhaps we should keep Vietnam’s golden moment in mind as we gear up for saturation media coverage of New Zealand’s medal achievements in Rio. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news