News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Rate of rheumatic fever requires comprehensive remedy

Shocking rate of rheumatic fever requires comprehensive remedy
 
The New Zealand Medical Journal has just reported on a study carried out in Northland revealing third-world rates of acute rheumatic fever amongst children.

This preventable disease is associated with poverty, poor access to health care and household crowding, and is an important cause of disability and premature death.

Acute rheumatic fever is now rare in most developed countries, but New Zealand it is relatively common.
 
CPAG spokesperson Professor Innes Asher says that “it is shocking that every week new children are admitted to hospital in New Zealand with this preventable disease which can permanently damage a child’s heart, whereas it is virtually unknown in comparable countries like Canada and the UK.”
 
There are high levels of socioeconomic deprivation, unemployment and one-parent families in Northland.  The rates of acute rheumatic fever there are amongst the highest in New Zealand, and disproportionately impact on Māori children.  Of 114 confirmed cases of acute rheumatic fever, 95% were Maori children, and 63 of these children resided in the most deprived decile.
 
In other parts of NZ, such as Counties Manukau, Pasifika children suffer even higher rates of rheumatic fever.
 
CPAG spokesperson Dr Nikki Turner said “The children in these families are clearly disadvantaged through growing up in poverty and this has lifetime consequences.”
 
Dr Turner said “The solution is equally clear.  Families must have access to adequate income, decent housing and primary care services if they are to protect their children from diseases associated with poverty.”
 
Professor Asher insists that “more is required to address rheumatic fever than the school sore throats programme already underway and funding of the development of a future vaccine.  The underlying causes must also be addressed boldly.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: Almost Getting Away With Murder

The Black Widow by Lee-Anne Cartier: Lee-Anne Cartier is the sister of the Christchurch man found to have been murdered by his wife, Helen Milner, after an initial assumption by police that his death, in 2009, was suicide. More>>

Howard Davis: Triple Echo - The Malevich/Reinhardt/Hotere Nexus

Howard Davis: The current juxtaposition of works by Ralph Hotere and Ad Reinhardt at Te Papa perfectly exemplifies Jean Michel Massing's preoccupation with the transmigration of imagery in a remarkable triple echo effect... More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Nō Tāu Manawa

Vaughan Rapatahana responds to Fale Aitu | Spirit House by Tusiata Avi.
More>>

9 Golds - 21 Medals: NZ Team Celebrates As Rio 2016 Paralympic Games Close

The entire New Zealand Paralympic Team, led by kiwi sprinter and double gold medallist Liam Malone as flag bearer, are on the bus to the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro for the Closing Ceremony of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games. There, they will celebrate the fantastic successes of the past 10 days. More>>

ALSO:

New Zealand Improv Festival: The Festival Of Moments To Return To The Capital

The eighth incarnation of the New Zealand Improv Festival comes to BATS Theatre this 4-8 October , with a stellar line-up of spontaneous theatre and instant comedy performed and directed by top improvisors from around New Zealand and the world. More>>

ALSO:

CDF Tim Keating: NZ Somme Centenary

"Our generals also knew what to expect, and they built that knowledge into their planning. Each of the four set-piece attacks was fought with a single brigade, with the expectation that the brigade would be used up. A fresh brigade would then be brought up to conduct the next set-piece..." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news