News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Predicting breast cancer recurrence

ROYAL AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS MEDIA RELEASE


Predicting breast cancer recurrence

Wednesday 8 May, 2013

While several factors can help predict breast cancer recurrence, less is known about the influence these factors have on the pattern of recurrence, notably its timing and site, delegates to the 82nd Annual Scientific Congress (ASC) of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons have been told.

Danielle Fitzpatrick, a medical student at the University of Adelaide, told an audience of specialist breast surgeons that recurrence could be predicted by tumour size, grade, oestrogen receptor (ER) status and the degree of lymph node (LN) involvement.

“Our study aimed to identify patient and tumour characteristics that predict risk periods for breast cancer relapse,” Miss Fitzpatrick said.

“We studied a cohort of 473 patients who presented to The Queen Elizabeth Hospital with recurrent breast cancer between 1968 and 2008. Patient and primary tumour characteristics were collected, including age, menopausal status, tumour grade, size (<2 or =2 cm), ER and progesterone receptor (PR) status and LN involvement. These factors were modelled against time to breast cancer relapse using Kaplan-Meier survival curves.

“”High tumour grade, size =2cm, ER negativity and PR negativity were all shown to significantly correlate with a higher incidence of earlier recurrence. Patients with ER negative disease who relapsed were almost twice as likely to present within two years of diagnosis than those with ER positive disease.

“Interestingly, LN involvement did not significantly correlate with time to relapse, but was shown to predict site of recurrence. Distant recurrences were found to be higher in node positive patients who relapsed (62%) compared with node negative patients (38%).

“Using these predictors will enable more tailored surveillance strategies with more appropriate discharge to primary care,” Miss Fitzpatrick said.

Approximately 1200 surgeons from New Zealand, Australia and around the world are attending the ASC, which runs from 6 to 10 May and is being held at Auckland’s Skycity/Crowne Plaza Convention Centre.

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

TV3 Video: Auckland Arts Festival Kicks Off

The Auckland Arts Festival kicks off March 4, with artists from New Zealand and all over the world on show. More>>

ALSO:

Te Matatini: Minister Applauds National Kapa Haka Festival

Education Minister Hekia Parata wishes the best of luck to everyone involved in this week’s national kapa haka festival, Te Matatini, in Christchurch. “Te Matatini showcases the very best of Māori performing arts talent. It’s a celebration of identity, language and culture at the highest level and I’m looking forward to being amongst it,” says Ms Parata. More>>

ALSO:

Kiwi Pride: Accolades For Film About Man Who Falls In Love With A Stick

A short animated film written and directed by New Zealand born Matthew Darragh has been selected for the Courts des îles, International Festival of Short Fiction Films. More>>

ALSO:

Anniversaries: Vivid Memories Four Years After Christchurch Quake

Four years ago, an earthquake that would change the lives of thousands shook Christchurch at 12.51 p.m. More>>

ALSO:

Environment 'n' Conservation: Slash Meets Tāne The Tuatara

Rock and Roll superstar and former Guns 'n' Roses guitarist Slash visited Zealandia Ecosanctuary along with collaborating band Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators. More>>

Canterbury Quakes: Feedback Sought On Short-Listed Memorial Designs

Six short-listed designs for the Canterbury Earthquake Memorial have been released for public input... The Memorial will honour the victims of Canterbury’s earthquakes and acknowledge the suffering of all those who lived through them as well as the heroism of those who participated in the rescue and recovery operations. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news