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Poll a Welcome Indication of Public Support For Children

Media release from Every Child Counts

Poll Result a Welcome Indication of Public Support For Children

The One News Colmar Brunton poll showing that 70 percent of the public supports State-funded food in schools reflects public concern about the impact of poverty on children and the need for the government to take action, says the ‘Community Campaign for Food in Schools’.

“Tonight’s poll reflects what New Zealanders up and down the country have been telling us: food in schools is a sensible policy that provides an immediate response to children in need and we want government action to address child poverty,” says Deborah Morris-Travers, manager of Every Child Counts.

“In a food producing nation like ours, it is scandalous to have children going hungry, yet that is the reality for many of the 270,000 children living in poverty.  For families on limited incomes, housing and electricity are likely to be paid for ahead of food, leaving some families short of the nutritious food that children need.

“It is good to see that so many people appreciate the importance of feeding children at school.  Food in schools is a practical, child-centred response to the impact of poverty on children.  It can increase health, improve education outcomes and build stronger communities.

“Children themselves have told us they want food in schools and that hunger is the priority issue associated with poverty.

“We look forward to the government’s food in schools announcement tomorrow.  We hope it will provide the most nutritious food possible to the most children possible, delivered in a way that builds school communities.  From there, we hope to see the government take steps to implement the wider recommendations of the Experts Advisory Group on Solutions to Child Poverty,” concludes Ms Morris-Travers.

Note to Editors: 

* Community Campaign for Food in Schools  

(as at 27 May)

Anglican Church

Auckland Action Against Poverty

Barnardos

Caritas Aotearoa NZ

Child Poverty Action Group

Choose Kids:  Students Giving Kiwi Kids a Chance

CTU Rūnanga

Every Child Counts

IHC

Manaia PHO

Methodist Church

NZ Educational Institute

NZ Nurses’ Organisation

NZ Principals’ Federation

Plunket

Poverty Action Waikato

PPTA

Quality Public Education Coalition (QPEC)

Salvation Army

Save the Children

Te ORA (Te Ohu Rata o Aotearoa):  Māori Medical Practitioners’ Association

Te Rōpū Wāhine Māori Toko i te Ora (Māori Women’s Welfare League)

Te Tai Tokerau PHO

Te Waka Huia Māori Cultural Group

Tertiary Education Union

The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners

Unicef NZ

Women’s Refuge

ENDS

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