News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


CASPER Claims Credit for Decrease in Youth, Maori Suicides

CASPER Claims Credit for Decrease in Youth and Maori Suicides

Embargoed until 4pm

26 August 2013 - CASPER’s tireless focus on providing families and communities with the knowledge and tools to prevent suicide has resulted in a drop in suicides for youth and Maori In figures released by the Chief Coroner today.

CASPER, a charity representing families who have lost loved ones to suicide, rejects the government’s notion that talking about suicide is dangerous. Joint founder and CEO Maria Bradshaw says they have spent the past three years running community education programmes. “We’ve been talking about suicide in the media and on social networks and sharing what bereaved families know now that they wish they had known before their loved ones died. We must keep talking about suicide, it’s the only way forward.”

CASPER presents the evidence that suicide is a social, not medical issue and that social rather than medical prescribing is the appropriate response to suicide risk. Bradshaw points proudly to the fact that in their three years of working with the families of suicide attempters, the group has not had one client die by suicide.

“CASPER has a strong focus on providing information and support to youth and Maori and the families and communities who support them. CASPER’s evidence that the medical approach taken by mental health services in New Zealand has been shown in research studies to actually increase rather than decrease suicide rates has been taken on board by the community. Suicidal thinking and behavior are triggered by negative life events and CASPER’s social prescribing model addresses the cause of suicide and of the key trigger – a feeling that everyone you love would be better off without you. Keeping suicide a secret and drugging those who are distressed makes no sense. Tackling the causes of distress and creating environments in which people have hope works to ensure people choose life rather than death.”

Bradshaw says they are proud of the work they are doing because it is producing the only outcome that matters – a reduction in suicide deaths.

“We know the contribution we have made to this because every day we receive calls and messages from grateful families who tell us that we helped them understand what causes suicide and therefore how to prevent it. They tell us their child is alive because of the information and support we provided to them.”

CASPER’s annual suicide prevention conference to mark world suicide prevention day will be held at in Auckland on 10 September. The conference will provide those attending with practical action they can take to keep their families, friends, colleagues and clients safe from suicide. It has a particular focus on youth, Maori, women and rural people. Media are encouraged to attend. Details for the conference and online registration can be found on the CASPER website at www.casper.org.nz

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Howard Davis: Never Too Old To Rock & Roll - Jethro Tull

As Greil Marcus recently observed in an NYRB review of Robbie Robertson's autobiographical Testimony, in rock and roll there is always an origin story. In the case of Jethro Tull founder Ian Anderson, he claims to have been influenced by his father's big band and jazz record collections and the emergence of rock music in the 1950s, but became disenchanted with the "show biz" style of early US stars like Elvis Presley... More>>

October: Alice Cooper Returns To NZ

It was March 1977 when Alice Cooper undertook his first ever concert tour of New Zealand – and broke attendance records. 40 years on and this revered entertainer continues to surprise and exude danger at every turn, thrilling audiences globally! More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: The Contemporary Relevance Of Denial

Denial has all the hallmarks of a riveting courtroom drama. Based on a 1996 British libel case that author David Irving brought against Lipstadt, the movie has been criticized as flat and stagey, but it nonetheless conveys a visceral clarity of vision and sense of overwhelming urgency. More>>

Obituary: John Clarke Dies Aged 68

Andrew Little: “I grew up with Fred Dagg and I am devastated by John Clarke’s death. He taught us to laugh at ourselves and more importantly laugh at our politicians.” More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis: Colin McCahon's 'on Going Out With The Tide'

Curated by Wystan Curnow and Robert Leonard, On Going Out with the Tide features major works that have been assembled from public and private collections across New Zealand and Australia. It focusses on McCahon’s evolving engagement with Māori subjects and themes, ranging from early treatments of koru imagery to later history paintings which refer to Māori prophets and investigate land-rights issues. More>>

Howard Davis: Rodger Fox Gets Out The Funk

By now a living New Zealand legend, band leader and trombonist Rodger Fox has performed with some of the biggest names in the jazz business, including Louie Bellson, Bill Reichenbach, Chuck Findley, Randy Crawford, Bobby Shew, Lanny Morgan, Bruce Paulson, Diane Schuur, Arturo Sandoval, David Clayton-Thomas, and Joe Williams, to name only a few. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news