News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Conflict over cannabis shows need for conversation

25/11/2013

Conflict over cannabis shows need for conversation

New Zealand needs to have a serious conversation about the health and social impacts of cannabis in light of a recent survey which found conflicting views about how we should treat people who use the drug.

The survey, conducted by Research New Zealand on behalf of the New Zealand Drug Foundation, found 58 percent of New Zealanders were in favour of retaining cannabis possession as a criminal offence, but 74 percent of people were in favour of providing health education and support to young people caught with cannabis at school rather than suspending or expelling them.

New Zealand Drug Foundation Executive Director Ross Bell said the findings show the need to have a serious conversation about cannabis to resolve the conflicting views about how we treat people who use the drug.

“On the one hand we have people saying that possession of cannabis should be treated as a criminal issue and on the other we have people saying we need to provide help and support,” Mr Bell said.

“This week we’re kicking this conversation off at an international symposium on cannabis and health. We’re known as a country with one of the highest rates of cannabis use in the world, especially among young New Zealanders. Now is the time to talk about what things we should be doing to change this, because clearly the status quo is not working.”

“A new approach is needed, one that recognises the growing science about the health harms of cannabis and also the evidence from around the world about more effective and earlier interventions that directly address these.”

The Drug Foundation is hosting the International drug policy symposium on cannabis health in Auckland this week, which brings together some of the sharpest minds from academia, the treatment sector, community groups and policy makers to share the current science on cannabis harms and lessons on how to reduce those.  The only other cannabis and health conference in New Zealand was held 20 years ago, also hosted by the Drug Foundation.

What: 2013 International Drug Policy Symposium. Through the maze: Cannabis and Health
Where: Rendezvous Hotel, 71 Mayoral Drive, Auckland
When: 27–29 November, 2013
Info: www.drugfoundation.org.nz/cannabis-and-health

Cannabis facts
·         46.4 percent of New Zealanders aged 16–64 have used cannabis at least once.
·         60.3 percent of New Zealanders aged between 25–35 have used cannabis at least once.
•          2006 research suggests that by age 25 almost 80% of New Zealanders will have used cannabis.
•          17: the median age New Zealanders first try cannabis.
•          One in seven New Zealanders aged 16–64 have used cannabis in the last year.
•          1.9 percent of New Zealanders use cannabis daily.
•          There were 5,981 Police apprehensions for possession of cannabis. This represents 83.65% of all Police apprehensions for possession of an illicit drug.
•          Apprehensions for possession or use of cannabis represented 84.16% of all Police apprehensions for possession or use of an illicit drug.
•          Low-level cannabis offences (possession/use/utensil) represented 52% of all Police apprehensions for any illicit drug offence.
Survey results
Q1. Currently, possession of even a small amount of cannabis is against the law. If cannabis possession was decriminalised, people caught with a small amount of cannabis would not receive a criminal conviction.  Do you support decriminalisation of the possession of a small amount of cannabis, or do you feel the law should stay as it is?

 TotalMaleFemale
Base =506190316
 %%%
Yes, I support the decriminalisation of the possession of a small amount of cannabis333433
No, the law should stay as it is/I do not support decriminalisation585659
Don't know9107
Refused001
Total100100100

Q2. Currently, young people in possession of cannabis at school may be suspended or expelled. Do you agree or disagree that it would be better to provide them with health education and support?

 TotalMaleFemale
Base =506190316
 %%%
Strongly disagree768
Disagree897
Neither agree nor disagree758
Agree353833
Strongly agree393840
Don't know333
Refused111
Total100100100

The base numbers shown are unweighted counts.
Total may not sum to 100% due to rounding.

Methodology

Interviewing for the survey took place between 9 and 21 November 2013 as part of Research New Zealand’s monthly omnibus survey, and is based on a nationally representative sample of n=506 adult New Zealanders, 18 years of age and over.

The data has been weighted by ethnicity and gender to ensure that the total sample results are truly representative of the New Zealand population. The weighting parameters were sourced from Statistics New Zealand and are based on the 2006 Census of Population and Dwellings.

Results based on the (weighted) total sample are subject to a maximum margin of error of +/- 4.6 percent (at the 95 percent confidence level). This means, for example, that had we found 50 percent of respondents supported the decriminalisation of cannabis, we could be 95 percent sure of getting the same result, plus or minus 4.6 percent, had we interviewed everyone in the population. Higher margins of error apply in the case of sub-samples.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Health
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news