News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


New training for midwives to help mums become smokefree

Media release

January 2014

New clinical training for midwives to help more Kiwi Mums become smokefree

New Zealand midwives will be better equipped to help pregnant women protect themselves and their unborn babies from smoking, with the launch of the new Te Hapū Ora clinical training programme for midwives.

The Te Hapū Ora programme will replace all previous smoking in pregnancy training, for midwives nationwide. The programme recognises the unique, close partnership between a midwife and a pregnant woman as well as addressing gaps in existing knowledge and training about smoking in pregnancy.

One in three pregnancies are affected by smoking, says programme Service Coordinator Kelsey Stewart. Yet many midwives don’t feel confident approaching the topic of ‘smoking while pregnant’ or recommending a referral to a cessation service as part of their clinical practice. “How do we have a conversation with a woman about smoking while being mindful that we don’t want to judge her for smoking during her pregnancy?” Recent research highlights how smoking is an addiction, not a social choice. “We have clear research that details the known risks of smoking in pregnancy, and the negative outcomes that can occur in infancy through to adulthood”, she says.

For some women, however, smoking while pregnant is considered ‘normal’ and the effects are minimised. “It may be that a woman has a premature baby but that’s happened for her previous pregnancies so she sees that as ‘normal’.” It’s not a normal experience for babies to spend time in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and better education about the serious risks of smoking is urgent in pregnancy. “Midwives and pregnant women can’t see a baby except during a 20 week scan so it’s easy to dismiss it as not real and underestimate the harm caused.” The new Te Hapū Ora programme uses a peertopeer training model. A team of 15 practicing midwives will be recruited, trained, resourced and supported to deliver the Te Hapū Ora workshops to practicing midwives. These specially trained midwives will be known as Clinical Link Champions (CLCs). Workshops will be available in each District Health Board (DHB) region over the next three years. Midwifery practices and hospital midwives will be advised of training dates as local deliveries are confirmed.

The new programme will see that midwives are clinically trained about smoking in pregnancy, and how to apply the ABC approach to provide best smokefree care to women who are pregnant and smoking. This model encourages health practitioners to Ask about and record smoking status, provide Brief smokefree advice (including information about cessation options); and recommend referral to a Cessation service.

“It is not the role of the midwife to provide multisession behavioural support to pregnant women who smoke. The skills and time required to support someone to become smokefree and to sustain that change sits outside the midwifery scope of practice,” says Mrs Stewart. However, a midwife could be the person who empowers a woman to make changes, by informing her about the effects of smoking in pregnancy, the benefits of being smokefree and referring them for cessation support. The training also ensures that a midwife is clinically informed about unexpected pregnancy and birthing outcomes, where smoking is likely to have been a key contributor.

As well as learning about the ABC approach, the Te Hapū Ora workshop comprises of group activities, discussions and the use of multimedia. Midwives will be enabled to share their experiences and best practice methods with each other. As part of the workshop training, midwives will be given exclusively designed resources to support their midwifery practice post training. Any ongoing support can be accessed via their local CLC.

CLCs are still being sought in Taranaki, Waikato, Capital and Coast, Wairarapa and Dunedin with payment provided for each workshop delivered. It is preferable that CLCs are practicing midwives with a passion to inspire their colleagues about smokefree pregnancies.

The Te Hapū Ora Programme will begin in the Upper North Island and South Island early this year before being rolled out into the rest of the country. Mrs Stewart says above all Te Hapū Ora aims to not only inform but inspire midwives to actively support women who are pregnant and smoking.

Kelsey Stewart

Te Hapū Ora Programme Service Co-ordinator

P O Box 33 459

Barrington, Christchurch 8244

M: 027 252 2013

E: kelsey@smokechange.co.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online

  • Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

    “Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

    ALSO:

    Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

    Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

    ALSO:

    Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

    Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

    ALSO:

    Scoop Review Of Books: Excerpt - Ice Bear: The Cultural History Of An Arctic Icon

    “During the last decade the image of the polar bear has moved in the public imagination from being an icon of strength, independence and survival in one of the most climatically extreme of world environments, to that of fragility, vulnerability and more generally of a global environmental crisis.” More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Health
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news