News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


High levels of E. coli in Taieri River near Waipiata

20 January, 2014

Otago Regional Council (ORC) water quality samples taken recently from the Taieri River between Creamery Road and Waipiata have shown high levels of the bacteria E.coli.

The ORC is erecting warning signs at popular swimming holes in the area.

Public Health South Medical Officer of Health Dr Marion Poore said high levels of E.coli have the potential to cause illness if swimmers swallow the contaminated water.

“We strongly recommend avoiding these areas, and if you are feeling sick with vomiting and or diarrhoea from having swum in or swallowed contaminated water contact your GP.”

Government water quality guidelines for recreational swimming areas are that, those with less than 260 E.coli/100ml should be safe, whereas water with more than 550 E.coli/100ml poses a health-risk. ORC’s most recent sampling in the area on 13 January showed E.coli levels at 1500/100ml.

ORC director engineering, hazards and science Dr Gavin Palmer said bird activity, river flow, stock in waterways or even whether it is a cloudy or sunny day, (as E.coli often dies quickly in clear water when exposed to sunlight), can influence actual bacteria counts.

“Local farmers have been notified of the problem and been asked to keep a watch on stock near waterways, ensuring they do not have access to the river,” he said.

ORC staff have conducted extensive ground inspections, tracking the river through adjacent farms, but have not found any conclusive cause of the E.coli contamination. Inspections of the river and tributaries by kayak have also failed to find any clear cause. Further inspections and water quality testing of the river are planned this week.

To find out when the water is safe to swim in contact the ORC.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news