News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Passionate Oral Health Advocated Key Note Speaker For Day

Passionate Oral Health Advocated Key Note Speaker For Day


A Dunedin professor and prolific researcher will be the key note speaker at “The Big Day In”, an annual educational day for dental professionals, in Hamilton tomorrow (Friday 24 January).

It is highly likely Prof Murray Thomson will drop in the F word (fluoride) at some stage during his presentation as he has been a passionate advocate for community water fluoridation for a number of years.

But that is just one component of oral health which Prof Thomson cares about.

The Professor of Dental Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Otago is well known for his contributions in several areas of dentistry, most notably the natural history of oral conditions (and associated disparities) in both young people and older adults.

During his talk at Waiora Waikato hospital campus, he will talk about the longitudinal study of a birth cohort of children who were born at the Queen Mary Hospital, Dunedin, New Zealand (NZ) between 1 April 1972 and 31 March 1973.

The sample that formed the basis for the longitudinal study was 1037 children who were assessed within a month of their third birthdays. Periodic collections of health and developmental data (including dental examinations) have been undertaken since then, and this study uses data collected from assessments conducted at ages 15, 18, 21, 26 and 32.

In a recent article Prof Thomson said more than 5000 New Zealand children per year have to undergo dental treatment under general anaesthesia because they have too much decay. Maori and poor children are over-represented, he said.

Of equal concern is the decay rate over time among older people residing in nursing homes which is more than double that seen among those in their own homes. Among those with dementia, it is twice as high again.

The Big Day In event was started by Waikato DHB principal dental officer Dr Rob Aitken in 2008.

Past speakers have included clinical psychologist Nigel Latta who presented on “The Politically Incorrect Guide to Teeth” which focused on children’s temperament and personality, and the implications for dental staff.

Dr Aitken works hard each year to put together a programme that is relevant and interesting.

“There is much to celebrate in dentistry, with huge changes in services in the past few years, including a new oral health model and new state-of-the-art dental clinics and mobile dental units for schools.

“Having nearly 70 per cent support in the recent Hamilton City Council referendum around community water fluoridation was also a highlight while the city council’s decision to delay putting it back in was ”very disappointing”, he said.

More than 200 people from around the region will attend the Big Day In.

Other speakers include Mr Simon Lou and Dr Andrew Mackie who will discuss unusual clinical situations and advise dental professionals attending this year’s Big Day In how to recognise and diagnose the unusual and the next steps in correct referral and treatrment.

An example of this is a child presenting with a gap where a tooth should be and finding out why the tooth has not come through.

“It’s around things that go bump in the night,” said Dr Aitken.

Waikato DHB chief executive Craig Climo, an ardent supporter of community water fluoridation as well, will open the event at 9am.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Joseph Cederwall Review: NZSO Plays Zappa

The first of the NZSO’s Shed Series concerts at the more informal and intimate space of Wellington's Shed 6 last Friday night featured music composed by, or with a connection to Frank Zappa. Zappa, a psychedelic rock legend, activist and popular culture figure and all round colourful character, was an excellent choice for the concert’s theme of innovation. More>>

Let The Games Begin: PM Sends Best Wishes To Athletes

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has sent her warm wishes to the New Zealand athletes preparing for the opening of the Commonwealth Games on Australia’s Gold Coast... More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review of Books: Martin Edmonds' The Expatriates

This book is an extension of, and tribute to, the life’s work of James McNeish. Without sacrificing any degree of authorial independence, the result is gracefully written, handsomely produced, and likely to propagate many further works of its kind. More>>

Max Rashbrooke Review: The King's Singers and Voices New Zealand

To be good at one thing is impressive; to be so versatile across a range of genres is truly exceptional. More>>

Joe Cederwall Review: WOMAD 2018 - Harmony of Difference (part 1)

A friend described WOMAD as his “favourite white middle class celebration of diversity.” There is certainly an echo of truth to this as the crowd is still largely white and middle class, but this WOMAD for me represented that a better world is possible ... More>>

Harmony of Difference (part 2)

Top international world music artists seldom make it down to this neck of the woods, so for those of us into this sort of thing WOMAD is certainly a welcome addition to the cultural calendar. Now it is a case of waiting and looking forward to seeing what they manage to conjure up for next year. More>>

Howard Davis Review: A Bigger Splash - Te Papa Celebrates Twenty Years

Considering the available resources, this is a decidedly hit-and-miss affair, mainly due to some highly questionable curatorial decisions. In their overweening wish to "push boundaries," Charlotte Davy and Megan Tamati-Quennell have made a number of serious miscalculations by ignoring a basic rule - keep it simple. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland