News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Study to evaluate best school clinic treatments

Study to evaluate best school clinic treatments
Media Release

University of Auckland

3 February 2014

A major research project evaluating the effectiveness of school clinics to help prevent acute rheumatic fever in children is underway in three district health boards.

This research is funded from the $24 million the Government allocated to rheumatic fever control in New Zealand.

The research, led by University of Auckland child health and infectious diseases researcher, Professor Diana Lennon, may determine future protocols for school-based sore throat clinics around the country.

The three health boards involved in the evaluation are Counties Manukau, Auckland and Bay of Plenty and the study will involve 700-1000 school-aged children in each area.

The three-year project is one of three research projects focussed on controlling rheumatic fever in children, underway this year for a total of $2.4 million funded by the Health Research Council NZ.
Group A streptococcal sore (GAS) throat is an infectious disease that can lead to acute rheumatic fever and associated heart disease, causing reduced life span in some.

Although acute rheumatic fever has largely been eliminated in the developed world, the rates in New Zealand’s Maori and Pacific communities are 30 to 60 times higher than in European and Asian people.

“To get the best outcome for these children, we will examine the success of various school clinic GAS control programmes in schools in these three district health board areas,” she says.

“The amount of GAS, both from skin and throat infections, will be measured before and after the commencement of these school clinics, and the study will also compare different initiatives that might reduce GAS in a selected group of schools,” says Professor Lennon. “Later on, the role of school clinics in rheumatic fever reduction will be measured.”

“The outcome of our research will we hope, help to fine tune the control of rheumatic fever in New Zealand,” she says.

“This latest study is part of a 30 year journey making progress on better control of rheumatic fever. Earlier studies have set the scene for the latest research projects. In recent years we have worked with the Heart Foundation of NZ to develop guidelines for treating GAS and rheumatic fever, to develop guidelines for primary prevention, diagnosis of rheumatic fever and sore throat management.”

“The amount of Group A strep in households is high. This is most likely because of over-crowding, poor access to healthcare and lack of health knowledge,” says Professor Lennon.

“Group A strep pharyngitis is very infectious. It may go away without treatment after three days, or it can develop into rheumatic fever three weeks later in a very small percentage of children,” she says.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Kiwi Pride: Accolades For Film About Man Who Falls In Love With A Stick

A short animated film written and directed by New Zealand born Matthew Darragh has been selected for the Courts des îles, International Festival of Short Fiction Films. More>>

ALSO:

Anniversaries: Vivid Memories Four Years After Christchurch Quake

Four years ago, an earthquake that would change the lives of thousands shook Christchurch at 12.51 p.m. More>>

ALSO:

Environment 'n' Conservation: Slash Meets Tāne The Tuatara

Rock and Roll superstar and former Guns 'n' Roses guitarist Slash visited Zealandia Ecosanctuary along with collaborating band Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators. More>>

Foo Fighters: Exclusive Show In Support Of Music Foundation

Frontier Touring has today announced that the Foo Fighters will play a last minute intimate and exclusive benefit show at the Auckland Town Hall this Friday February 20 with all profits going to The New Zealand Music Foundation. More>>

ALSO:

Canterbury Quakes: Feedback Sought On Short-Listed Memorial Designs

Six short-listed designs for the Canterbury Earthquake Memorial have been released for public input... The Memorial will honour the victims of Canterbury’s earthquakes and acknowledge the suffering of all those who lived through them as well as the heroism of those who participated in the rescue and recovery operations. More>>

ALSO:

Celia Lashlie: Legacy Will Live On

Social justice advocate Celia Lashlie leaves a legacy that will continue to have a positive impact on the lives of New Zealanders for years to come, Labour Leader Andrew Little says. “Celia was a powerful voice for reason, sense and compassion. Her work, particularly with teenage boys, was ground-breaking." More>>

ALSO:

Obituary: Sad Farewell To PPTA Activist Robin Duff

Duff has been a long-time fixture of the association... Most recently Duff has been working hard to support Canterbury teachers through the quakes that devastated the region. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news