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Stroke and dementia researcher to speak in Queenstown


PRESS RELEASE
For immediate release: 7 February 2014

THE NEUROLOGICAL FOUNDATION PRESENTS FREE PUBLIC LECTURE IN QUEENSTOWN:

PROFESSOR VLADIMIR HACHINSKI
Brain countdown: Can we prevent stroke and delay dementia?

The Neurological Foundation of New Zealand is pleased to present a free public lecture in Queenstown by world-leading neurologist Professor Vladimir Hachinski, a pioneer in the study of stroke and dementia.

One of the greatest advances in the understanding of brain disorders comes from the realisation that Alzheimer’s disease and vascular cognitive impairment (impairment caused by strokes) share common risk factors. This realisation opens the door to a common prevention and treatment approach to both, and promises that if vascular risk factors are controlled, then not only strokes but also cognitive impairment could be prevented.

Leading significant research in this field, Professor Hachinski coordinates a group involved in experimental, clinical and population studies in the prevention of stroke and the delay of Alzheimer’s disease. In this lecture, Professor Hachinski will discuss his four-decade research and clinical observations, and outline the critical factors that will pave the way to future therapeutic and prevention strategies.

In 1975 Professor Hachinski pioneered with neurologist Professor John W Norris the first successful acute stroke unit globally, and this model has become the international standard of care for stroke patients. These specialised treatment units, now in operation in hospitals around the world, save lives and prevent complications for thousands of stroke patients every year.

Professor Hachinski is past President of the World Federation of Neurology, and belongs to the Order of Canada, the country’s highest award.

Date: Monday 24 February 2014
Time: 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Venue: Queenstown Memorial Centre, 1 Memorial Street, Queenstown

NO BOOKINGS REQUIRED. PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY TO SECURE SEATING. PARKING ON-SITE.

The Neurological Foundation is an independent body and charitable trust and its funding has facilitated many of New Zealand’s top neuroscientists’ pioneering breakthroughs. For further information, visit www.neurological.org.nz

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