News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Campaign begins to put diabetes patients first

Campaign begins to put diabetes patients first

A public campaign to “Put Patients First” has been launched to stop the Hawke’s Bay District Health Board’s axing of a crucial diabetes service that is successfully changing patients’ lives.

The DHB has announced it will no longer fund the GPSI (General Practitioner Special Interest) (pronounced like gypsy) Diabetes Service despite outstanding and ongoing clinical outcomes for patients, which are also closing the inequality gap for Maori with diabetes.

Lowe Corporation Managing Director Andy Lowe, who was approached to help by his staff who have experienced the benefits of the GPSI service, is putting his support behind the campaign and is calling on the public for their help.

The group has written an open letter to all community stakeholders to join the campaign in asking the Hawke’s Bay District Health Board to revisit its decision to not renew the GPSI service, which is run by Dr Janet Titchener.

“Patients we have talked to tell us that the GPSI service has been life changing, giving them the power to live with their life long condition, instead of letting diabetes control them,” said Mr Lowe.

The GPSI contract with the DHB has been costing only $150,000 a year, representing a tiny amount of the DHB’s annual budget. This allows for about 100 patients from Wairoa to Central Hawke’s Bay to access the service.

“We have met with the DHB management to try and keep the service going in the best interest of patients. But, despite these outstanding outcomes, the DHB has told us it will no longer fund the GPSI service in order to reduce costs.

“We have asked the DHB to provide us with the evidence to support its case, but as yet we have not received any information.

“Accordingly we have requested this information under the Official Information Act as a matter of urgency given the GPSI service is only funded until March, which potentially puts patients at risk.

“I have also offered to personally pay for an independent review of the HB DHB’s costs and outcomes compared with those of the GPSI service,” said Mr Lowe.

Losing the Hawke’s Bay GPSI diabetes service is a blow to local diabetes sufferers and to community health in the region. Keeping the service running is a matter of public interest, said Mr Lowe.

Putting Patients First is planning a hui that will call on the DHB to reconsider its short-sighted decision. A date will be confirmed shortly.

Members of the public can join the campaign by registering at info@putpatientsfirst.co.nz
There is a Facebook page for supporters of GPSI https://www.facebook.com/supporters.gpsi.diabetes

The GPSI Diabetes Service has been supported by the Hawke’s Bay District Health Board for the past 8 years. The service is provided from multiple locations within the community.

Patients are referred into the service by their general practitioner. Using a patient centred model of care, each person is seen for a series of appointments in quick succession with the goal of empowering each person with the skills to self-manage their own diabetes. The patient is then discharged from the service back to the care of their GP.

Anyone with type 2 diabetes who attends the GPSI Service has both immediate and long-term improvements in their diabetes control as measured by a blood test called an HbA1c. Based on international data, a person who reduces their HbA1c by 10 mmol/mol will cut health care costs by over 37%. Patients who attend the GPSI Diabetes Service experience, on average, a decrease in HbA1c twice this – 20 mmol/mol.

For every year that a person holds a 10 mmol/mol reduction in their HbA1c they are 30% less likely to develop kidney disease, have a heart attack or a stroke and have a 22% reduction in their risk of going blind or losing their legs. At the GPSI Diabetes Service we don’t just have a 10 mmol/mol reduction in HbA1c but a 20 mmol/mol reduction.

Maori and Pacific Island people seen in the GPSI Diabetes Service do even better, essentially closing the ethnic gap in diabetes care. Maori referred to the GPSI Diabetes Service start out with HbA1c values 20 mmol/mol higher than European New Zealanders. However, immediately after they have attended the service, this ethnic disparity in HbA1c disappears.

Community based, patient centred care that empowers patients to self-manage their own disease are all the healthcare parameters the Ministry of Health espouses to ensure that care is successful for all patients regardless of ethnicity, cost effective and accessible to all patients. The GPSI Diabetes Service fulfils all of these parameters, yet the Hawkes Bay DHB chooses to discontinue the service

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Review: Howard Davis On Olivier Assayas' 'Personal Shopper'

Olivier Assayas’ Personal Shopper is stylish, mysterious, and very strange indeed. It manages to be both ghost story and suspense thriller, yet also a portrait of numbed loneliness and ennui , held together by an peculiarly inexpressive performance from ... More>>

Howard Davis: Never Too Old To Rock & Roll - Jethro Tull

As Greil Marcus recently observed in an NYRB review of Robbie Robertson's autobiographical Testimony, in rock and roll there is always an origin story. In the case of Jethro Tull founder Ian Anderson, he claims to have been influenced by his father's big band and jazz record collections and the emergence of rock music in the 1950s, but became disenchanted with the "show biz" style of early US stars like Elvis Presley... More>>

October: Alice Cooper Returns To NZ

It was March 1977 when Alice Cooper undertook his first ever concert tour of New Zealand – and broke attendance records. 40 years on and this revered entertainer continues to surprise and exude danger at every turn, thrilling audiences globally! More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: The Contemporary Relevance Of Denial

Denial has all the hallmarks of a riveting courtroom drama. Based on a 1996 British libel case that author David Irving brought against Lipstadt, the movie has been criticized as flat and stagey, but it nonetheless conveys a visceral clarity of vision and sense of overwhelming urgency. More>>

Obituary: John Clarke Dies Aged 68

Andrew Little: “I grew up with Fred Dagg and I am devastated by John Clarke’s death. He taught us to laugh at ourselves and more importantly laugh at our politicians.” More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis: Colin McCahon's 'on Going Out With The Tide'

Curated by Wystan Curnow and Robert Leonard, On Going Out with the Tide features major works that have been assembled from public and private collections across New Zealand and Australia. It focusses on McCahon’s evolving engagement with Māori subjects and themes, ranging from early treatments of koru imagery to later history paintings which refer to Māori prophets and investigate land-rights issues. More>>

Howard Davis: Rodger Fox Gets Out The Funk

By now a living New Zealand legend, band leader and trombonist Rodger Fox has performed with some of the biggest names in the jazz business, including Louie Bellson, Bill Reichenbach, Chuck Findley, Randy Crawford, Bobby Shew, Lanny Morgan, Bruce Paulson, Diane Schuur, Arturo Sandoval, David Clayton-Thomas, and Joe Williams, to name only a few. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news