News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Community pharmacies help treat diarrhoea

Community pharmacies help treat diarrhoea

21 February 2014

A two-year health pilot in community pharmacies aimed at reducing risks of dehydration due to gastroenteritis in children, is proving its worth with impressive uptake throughout the MidCentral region.

Funded by MidCentral District Health Board, the community pharmacy Paediatric Gastroenteritis Service is available to children aged three months to 16 years of age, allowing specially trained community pharmacists to assess children suffering from gastroenteritis, while providing treatment and education to mild cases at no cost to the family.

To the end of December 2013, the service was provided by all but three of MidCentral’s community pharmacies and was used by 91 children - 87 of these being managed within the pharmacy.

MidCentral DHB Pharmacy Advisor Andrew Orange said the benefits of using community pharmacists means professional advice is more accessible, with early treatment aiming to prevent a more serious condition that requires a trip to the hospital’s emergency department.

“The service aims to reduce the likelihood of cases that can be easily treated at home, presenting in ED. If a child needs to be hospitalised, the length of stay should be significantly reduced.

“Early indications are that the service has been successful, and to date, we know of only two children that have been assessed and managed by a pharmacist who then needed an ED visit – with only one needing a brief stay in the children’s ward.”

Foxton’s Amcal Gimbletts Pharmacy has seen a large number of families use the programme, showing demand for such an initiative is there.

Pharmacy owner Neville Gimblett said: “Gastroenteritis re-hydration therapy is a great idea, especially in a small town like Foxton as we are quite distant from the hospital.

“Providing such a service does not only calm the worrying parents who are unable to seek immediate medical attention, it also helps reduce potential hospital visits as most mild cases can be treated within the pharmacy itself at no charge.”

Another feature of the programme is that along with the patient’s general practitioner, MidCentral District Health Board’s Public Health Unit is notified of any cases of gastroenteritis, so any potential outbreaks can be tracked.

The programme is nearing the end of its two-year pilot stage and is about to be reviewed.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news