News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Measles alert in Hawke’s Bay

6 March 2014

Measles alert in Hawke’s Bay

Two young New Zealand men, who recently travelled overseas, have been diagnosed with measles in Hawke’s Bay.

Both are now well, out of isolation and were not hospitalised.

These are the first confirmed cases of measles in Hawke’s Bay since 2012.

Medical Officer of Health Caroline McElnay said exposure to other people in Hawke’s Bay was unlikely, but possible.

Dr McElnay said those people who had flown with these two passengers on Air New Zealand from Brisbane to Auckland on Flight NZ136 leaving Brisbane at 11:15am on Sunday 23 February, and sat nearest to them would be followed up by public health either in Auckland or by their own public health service.

“However because measles is an infectious, airborne disease, we want everyone to be vigilant, and make sure vaccinations are up-to-date.”

It can take 10-14 days for someone who has caught measles to start showing any symptoms.

Measles symptoms include a high fever, cough, runny nose, red eyes and a rash that starts on the face and neck before spreading elsewhere. The rash is not itchy and fades during the first week. A person with measles looks and feels unwell and about 10 percent of people with measles need admission to hospital.
Measles is more serious in young infants and in older adults, as well as people with low immunity.

There have been 79 confirmed cases of measles reported in New Zealand since the end of December 2013 which includes the two recent cases in Hawke’s Bay.


Measles can be a serious illness, Dr McElnay said. “There is no treatment. The only way to avoid catching measles is to have had two measles vaccines after your first birthday.”

She urged anyone uncertain of whether they or their family were vaccinated to check with their GP to see if they were protected.
ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news