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NZ research challenges longstanding sugar equals energy myth

11 March 2014

NZ research challenges longstanding ‘sugar equals energy’ myth

Findings challenge status quo sports drinks

• AUT University’s Sports Performance Research Institute NZ (SPRINZ) tests SOS Rehydrate vs market leader
• Sugar intake not needed for energy, may cause detrimental long term health effects
• Kiwi entrepreneurs and American doctor reinventing ‘lifestyle hydration’ market

Decades of belief that high sugar levels in sports drinks are essential for aerobic exercise have been challenged today by SOS Rehydration in a research project that pitted SOS Rehydrate oral rehydration product against the market leading sports drink. The surprising results are set to cause a global stir.

Founder and Medical Doctor Dr Blanca Lizaola touched down in New Zealand to join Kiwi entrepreneur and business partner Thomas Mayo as the astonishing preliminary findings are announced.

The study, conducted by AUT University’s Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand, used eight mid-level distance runners who took part in single blind trials in which they drank 500ml of either the market leading sports drink or SOS, followed by a 75 minute treadmill run. Before, during and after their run their blood glucose, blood lactate, heart rate, blood pressure and feelings of thirst and fatigue were recorded. Their desire to, and consequent, urination during or after the run was also recorded to see how their body was reacting to the specific drink.

The results were extremely positive – for all recorded measures there were no differences between trials, clearly contradicting the general belief that high levels of sugar are essential for this type of aerobic exercise.

The market leading sports drink contained seven times more carbohydrates in the form of sugar (36 gr vs 5 gr) than SOS yet all physiological and perceptual measures were identical. In addition the high sugar content of the market leader, ingested frequently over time, could potentially lead to long term health problems like chronic dehydration, obesity, diabetes and hypertension.

The brain-child of Dr Lizaola, SOS is a revolutionary rehydration solution that was inspired by her experience in a Mexico City hospital where oral hydration therapy was favoured for cost reasons. Now, SOS Rehydrate has taken off globally and is used by some of the world’s top sports people (Scott Dixon, Oracle team, Hamish Carter, Sir Ben Ainslie and professional basketball player CJ Watson) as well as those wanting a low sugar, non-artificial ingredient rehydration solution.

“I am truly blown away by the results and delighted that the findings support what we have believed for months – high levels of sugar are not essential for aerobic exercise. This research supports our mission to provide a healthy sports drink that decreases the number of people putting their health at risk by ingesting high levels of sugar,” says Dr Lizaola.

“We’ve managed to create a product that doesn’t just meet World Health Organisation standards but is also able to provide substantial rehydration without unnecessary excess sugar which can potentially put your health at risk.”

AUT University Associate Professor Andrew Kilding says, “We observed notable differences between the drink and exercise trials with regards to each participant’s ability to retain the fluid consumed.”

Dr Lizaola says as well as being impractical, this could indicate that unnecessary consumption of high carbohydrate-based sports drinks could have a negative impact on an individual’s long term hydration status.

About SOS Rehydrate
SOS is a fast-acting electrolyte replacement and hydration drink that helps combat and prevent dehydration caused by active lifestyles and physical performance. The SOS drink mix is as effective as an intravenous drip for mild to moderate dehydration.

Using the best in medical science, SOS is engineered by a leading doctor, two former elite athletes, and a retired military medical officer with the purpose of solving dehydration in order to improve overall human performance. The scientific method of oral rehydration therapy and water absorption follows standards set out by UNICEF and the World Health Organisation.

Go to www.sosrehydrate.com for stockists or to buy online.

ENDS

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