News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Litigation Withdrawn as Mayor & Wellington Step Up

AUCKLAND RESCUE HELICOPTER TRUST

MEDIA STATEMENT

THURSDAY 13 MARCH 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Litigation Withdrawn as Mayor & Wellington Step Up

The Auckland Rescue Helicopter Trust has today abandoned its plans to sue the Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Board over 2014/15 funding cuts after Mayor Len Brown announced Auckland Council will work to fix the current funding arrangements in time for the 2015/15 funding round.

This afternoon, the Mayor announced he would work with his council colleagues to plug the $900,000 funding gap for the 2014/15 financial year and work with Central Government to fix the flawed Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act 2008, which forces essential rescue services to compete with arts organisations for funds.

Associate Local Government Minister Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga has since confirmed the Government will work constructively with the Mayor on the issue.

Senior opposition MP David Shearer has also announced that the Labour Party will co-operate with speedily fixing the problem.

“This is fantastic news and the Mayor, Minister and Mr Shearer are to be commended for recognising the current situation is not acceptable,” Murray Bolton, Chairman of the Auckland Rescue Helicopter Trust, said today.

“It enables us to abandon the litigation for 2014/15 and future years, saving our helicopter service about $300,000 and ratepayers about $500,000 a year in legal fees – a genuine win/win for everyone. We look forward to meeting with the Mayor and his team in the next few days to work out details.”

Looking ahead, Mr Bolton said the Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act 2008 had been passed prior to the new Super City being formed and was in any case fatally flawed, forcing essential rescue services and arts organisations to compete for funds.

“Let’s be clear: we have nothing against the orchestra, the arts festival, the opera or the theatre – we just don’t want funding for our essential service to be cut to support them,” he said.

“We look forward to discussing with the Mayor and the Minister what changes to the legislation are needed before funding decisions are made for 2015/16, to avoid the acrimony of recent years.”

END

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news