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St John patient part charges to increase 1 April 2014

St John patient part charges to increase 1 April 2014

On 1 April 2014 the St John emergency ambulance patient part charge will increase by either $4.00 or $13.00, to a single rate of $88.00 across New Zealand (from two rates of $75.00 and $84.00 previously).
The flat rate charge for those not eligible for New Zealand publicly funded health services will also increase - from $769.00 to $800.00.

St John charges a part charge to patients who are treated by an ambulance officer or who are transported in an ambulance, because of a medical emergency.

“We are increasing our part charges in response to increasing demand for our services. In the year ending 30 June 2013 the number of 111 emergency calls for an ambulance increased by over 14,000 compared to the previous year,” says St John Operations Director Michael Brooke.

“People tell us they are comfortable to pay a part charge, given the high quality of the service and treatment they receive, and when they understand that the part charge goes towards funding frontline ambulance staff.”

Table of patient part charges for medical emergencies:

AreaCurrent rateRate as at 1 April 2014
Northland, Taranaki, Manawatu, Whanganui$75.00$88.00
Auckland Coromandel, Waikato (including Taumarunui), Bay of Plenty, Hawke’s Bay, Lakes, Tairawhiti, all of the South Island$84.00

NB St John does not provide emergency ambulance services in Wellington or the Wairarapa.

Additional info:
Contracts with the Ministry of Health, ACC and District Health Boards fund nearly 80% of St John Ambulance Service direct operating costs. The shortfall is made up from community donations, fundraising, revenue from commercial activities, the contribution of volunteers, as well as contributions from part charges. St John is a charity and relies on financial and voluntary support from the community to help fund all the services it provides to New Zealanders.

Nearly 5,000 St John staff are involved in emergency ambulance, patient transfer services and events - over 60% of whom are volunteers. They care for and save the lives of thousands of New Zealanders and visitors to the country every year. St John staff treat over 415,000 people each year.

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