News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Doctors Warn of Severe Health Impacts from Climate Change

New Zealand Doctors Warn of Severe Health Impacts from Climate Change

New Zealand public health doctors are warning there will be severe health impacts from Climate Change and are calling for urgent action from all levels of society.

The New Zealand College of Public Health Medicine says that climate change is already contributing to the global burden of disease and premature death, but much worse is coming.

“Human-caused climate change is a serious threat to health and as difficult as it might be, we need to take urgent action now as individuals, health professionals and at governmental level,” says College President Dr Julia Peters.

“Climate change will almost certainly lead to food and water shortages, increased mental health issues, more injury and illness, and more heat related deaths and illness from extreme weather. It will also probably cause more mosquito borne diseases, skin cancer, cardio-respiratory disease and toxic shellfish poisoning, to name just a few,” says Dr Peters.

“As is frequently the case, the health of New Zealand's poorest will suffer most from climate change. In New Zealand, Māori and Pacific peoples, and lower socio economic groups will be by far the worst hit, seriously impacting health equity in the immediate future and for generations to come.

“In addition, many populated areas of the world will be unable to support human health and well-being and New Zealand is likely to have increased climate refugee and migrant populations as a result.”

The College, which has formally released its Climate Change Policy Statement, is calling for concerted action from the public, institutions and governments to address climate change across the board.

“This would be a win-win approach. Not only could we avert some of the health problems heading towards us because of Climate Change, we could also see many health benefits. Changes that lead to reduced emissions are likely to improve levels of obesity, heart disease, cancer, Type 2 diabetes, thereby improving population health and saving scarce health funds.

“All of us can take actions that benefit the environment whether it is leaving the private motor vehicle at home or increasing the energy efficiency of our own homes. Health and other institutions can take steps to reduce their carbon footprint and the government also needs to take steps to establish more ambitious goals and targets for reduced carbon emissions.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news