News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Cochlear implant use at an all-time high, audiologist says

Cochlear implant use at an all-time high, audiologist says

As Hearing Week (23 - 30 March) begins, the number of profoundly deaf children and adults receiving cochlear implants is at an all-time high with 596 adults and children currently registered with the Southern Cochlear Implant Programme - compared to 70 in 2003.

The Christchurch-based programme serves profoundly deaf children and adults in the Lower North Island and the South Island.

Its General Manager, Neil Heslop, says the increase does not necessarily mean an overall deterioration in hearing health, but does reflect growing awareness of technologies available to people with significant hearing problems.

Cochlear implants are similar in size to high-powered hearing aids and help severe to profoundly deaf people who gain little or no benefit from hearing aids.

The implants transform speech and other sounds into electrical energy that stimulates auditory nerve fibres in the inner ear.

Heslop says government funding covers the costs of an implant in one ear and some patients or their families choose to fund a second implant themselves.

"Approximately 20 to 25 percent of families pay for a second implant for their children. But it is expensive and costs them between $45,000 and $50,000."

Heslop says cochlear implants change lives.

"We know how effective cochlear implants can be and it is always a delight to see the impact they have on our patients who, literally, hear things differently for the first time in their lives in many cases."

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news