News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Study of 1000s of NZ fruit & vege prices shows markets best

Study of 1000s of NZ fruit & vege prices shows markets best value

A family of four could save as much as $49 per week by buying their fruit and vegetables at markets other than from a supermarket, a University of Otago Wellington study shows.

The study collected 3120 prices for fruit and vegetables at markets and supermarkets in Wellington and Christchurch. It found that commonly purchased produce such as apples, oranges, broccoli, cabbage, carrots and tomatoes were on average significantly cheaper at fruit and vegetable markets compared to supermarkets in Wellington and Christchurch.
The researchers developed a hypothetical weekly “shopping basket” for a two adult, two child family containing ideal amounts of fruit and vegetables from a health perspective. They then compared the costs of the basket at various outlets.

Fruit and vegetable markets were the cheapest at $76 per weekly basket. Online supermarkets were the next cheapest at $113, although this could be offset by delivery charges, says one of the study’s authors, Dr Amber Pearson. The difference between the cost of the basket at a fruit and vege market compared to a supermarket was $49 less at the market.

Farmers’ markets that sell from local growers were the most expensive of the outlets studied, at $138 per basket. But a third of the items in the basket were still significantly cheaper than supermarkets, including cauliflower, silverbeet, spinach, cucumber and pumpkin.

The researchers note that farmers markets also have the advantages of expanding consumer choice by providing more access to local produce and more “organic” produce – with such organic produce having lower pesticide levels.

Another author of the study, Associate Professor Nick Wilson, says there is strong scientific evidence that high fruit and vegetable consumption protects against heart disease, stroke and some cancers, but the reality is that it isn’t always easy for low income families to buy enough of this produce.

One way to overcome this cost barrier is for New Zealand to explore following the approach of some US jurisdictions where fruit and vege vouchers are provided to low-income people, he says.

“If these are usable at markets, then this can help support local growers as well – so it can be good for regional employment.”

Another approach is for local government to increase support for fruit and vege markets in various ways – something that some Councils in parts of the country have already done by providing free space for holding markets.

In summarising the research, Dr Pearson says there is a need for society to better understand the benefits of fruit and vegetable markets for health – “but also in terms of wider benefits such as supporting local agriculture and building community cohesion”.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Trading Places

Greg Clydesdale, a lecturer in business at Lincoln University, has written a comprehensive account of global trade from the seventh century to modern times. More>>

Sheep: Shearing Record Smashed In Hawke’s Bay

Three shearers gathered from around New Zealand have smashed a World record by 264 sheep despite the heat, the pumiced sheep of inland Hawke’s Bay and a year’s wool weighing an average of over 3.5kg a sheep. More>>

ALSO:

Carrie Fisher: Hollywood In-Breeding & The Velocity Of Being - Binoy Kampmark

There was always going to be a good deal of thick drama around Carrie Fisher, by her own confession, a product of Hollywood in-breeding. Her parents, Debbie Reynolds and the crooner Eddie Fisher, provided ample material for the gossip columns in a marriage breakup after Eddie sped away with Elizabeth Taylor. More>>

  • Image: Tracey Nearmy / EPA
  • Gordon Campbell: On The Best Albums Of 2016

    OK, I’m not even going to try and rationalise this surrender to a ‘best of’ listicle. Still…maybe there is an argument for making some semblance of narrative order out of a year that brought us Trump, Brexit and the deaths of Prince, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen and Alan Vega, who I missed just as much as the Big Three. So without further ado….oh, but first a word from the sponsor More>>

    Emojis: World’s First Māori Emoji App Launched

    It’s here - the world’s first Māori emoji app Emotiki has landed just in time for summer roadtrips and santa stockings, with 200 Māori and Kiwi cultural icons for people to share their kiwiana moments with each other and the world. More>>

    ALSO:

    Howard Davis: Album Of The Year - Van Morrison's 'Keep Me Singing'

    2016 was a grand year for Van The Man - The Belfast Cowboy turned 71, received a knighthood, and reissued an expanded set of soul-fired live recordings from 1973 ('It's Too Late to Stop Now'). In the game for 53 years now, Morrison's albums consistently open new windows into the heart and soul of one of the most enigmatic figures in modern music. More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Health
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news